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Article: Visual field differences in visual word recognition can emerge purely from perceptual learning: Evidence from modeling Chinese character pronunciation

TitleVisual field differences in visual word recognition can emerge purely from perceptual learning: Evidence from modeling Chinese character pronunciation
Authors
KeywordsChinese character recognition
Computational modeling
Hemispheric asymmetry
Perceptual learning
Visual word recognition
Issue Date2011
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/b&l
Citation
Brain And Language, 2011, v. 119 n. 2, p. 89-98 How to Cite?
AbstractIn Chinese orthography, a dominant character structure exists in which a semantic radical appears on the left and a phonetic radical on the right (SP characters); a minority opposite arrangement also exists (PS characters). As the number of phonetic radical types is much greater than semantic radical types, in SP characters the information is skewed to the right, whereas in PS characters it is skewed to the left. Through training a computational model for SP and PS character recognition that takes into account of the locations in which the characters appear in the visual field during learning, but does not assume any fundamental hemispheric processing difference, we show that visual field differences can emerge as a consequence of the fundamental structural differences in information between SP and PS characters, as opposed to the fundamental processing differences between the two hemispheres. This modeling result is also consistent with behavioral naming performance. This work provides strong evidence that perceptual learning, i.e., the information structure of word stimuli to which the readers have long been exposed, is one of the factors that accounts for hemispheric asymmetry effects in visual word recognition. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/138110
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.038
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.913
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
HKU10400471
Research Grant Council of Hong KongHKU 744509H
Funding Information:

I am grateful to the HKU Seed Funding Program for Basic Research (Project #10400471 to J.H. Hsiao) and the Research Grant Council of Hong Kong (Project code: HKU 744509H to J.H. Hsiao). Many thanks to Dr. Richard Shillcock, University of Edinburgh, for his advice during this research project. I also thank the editor and two anonymous referees for helpful comments.

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHsiao, JHWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:40:27Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:40:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBrain And Language, 2011, v. 119 n. 2, p. 89-98en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0093-934Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/138110-
dc.description.abstractIn Chinese orthography, a dominant character structure exists in which a semantic radical appears on the left and a phonetic radical on the right (SP characters); a minority opposite arrangement also exists (PS characters). As the number of phonetic radical types is much greater than semantic radical types, in SP characters the information is skewed to the right, whereas in PS characters it is skewed to the left. Through training a computational model for SP and PS character recognition that takes into account of the locations in which the characters appear in the visual field during learning, but does not assume any fundamental hemispheric processing difference, we show that visual field differences can emerge as a consequence of the fundamental structural differences in information between SP and PS characters, as opposed to the fundamental processing differences between the two hemispheres. This modeling result is also consistent with behavioral naming performance. This work provides strong evidence that perceptual learning, i.e., the information structure of word stimuli to which the readers have long been exposed, is one of the factors that accounts for hemispheric asymmetry effects in visual word recognition. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/b&len_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBrain and Languageen_HK
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in <Brain and Language>. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in PUBLICATION, [VOL 119, ISSUE 2, (2011)] DOI 10.1016/j.bandl.2011.04.003-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectChinese character recognitionen_HK
dc.subjectComputational modelingen_HK
dc.subjectHemispheric asymmetryen_HK
dc.subjectPerceptual learningen_HK
dc.subjectVisual word recognitionen_HK
dc.subject.meshBrain - physiology-
dc.subject.meshFunctional Laterality - physiology-
dc.subject.meshLanguage-
dc.subject.meshLearning - physiology-
dc.subject.meshPattern Recognition, Visual - physiology-
dc.titleVisual field differences in visual word recognition can emerge purely from perceptual learning: Evidence from modeling Chinese character pronunciationen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0093-934X&volume=119&issue=2&spage=89&epage=98&date=2011&atitle=Visual+field+differences+in+visual+word+recognition+can+emerge+purely+from+perceptual+learning:+evidence+from+modeling+Chinese+character+pronunciation-
dc.identifier.emailHsiao, JHW:jhsiao@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHsiao, JHW=rp00632en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bandl.2011.04.003en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21620456-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80052678483en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros191806en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros202581-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80052678483&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume119en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage89en_HK
dc.identifier.epage98en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000295197700005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.relation.projectThe two sides of cognition: Hemispheric processing of face and word recognition-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHsiao, JHW=7101605473en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9409165-

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