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Article: Heading but not path or the tau-equalization strategy is used in the visual control of steering toward a goal

TitleHeading but not path or the tau-equalization strategy is used in the visual control of steering toward a goal
Authors
KeywordsEgocentric direction
Heading
Locomotion control
Optic flow
Path
Time to contact (tau)
Issue Date2011
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
Citation
Journal Of Vision, 2011, v. 11 n. 12 How to Cite?
AbstractThe visual strategies for the control of steering toward a goal include aligning one's instantaneous direction of travel (i.e., heading; J. J. Gibson, 1950) or the future path (J. P. Wann & D. K. Swapp, 2000) specified by optic flow with the target, equating the time to closure of the target-heading angle with the time to passage of the target (tau equalization, B. Fajen, 2001), or using the target egocentric direction and steering to center the target in the straight ahead or cancel the target optical drift (S. K. Rushton, J. M. Harris, M. Lloyd, & J. P. Wann, 1998). Supporting evidences for the use of these strategies in guiding steering or walking toward a goal were reported, but no consensus has been reached. In this study, by presenting participants with displays in which target egocentric direction was fixed and thus unavailable for steering to force participants to rely on information from optic flow for the control of self-motion, we systematically examined the use of the optic flow-based strategies in the visual control of steering toward a goal. We found that participants steered to align their heading with the target, supporting the use of the heading strategy. We found no evidence to support the use of the path or the tau-equalization strategy in the visual control of steering toward a goal. © ARVO.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/138108
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.341
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.042
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council of Hong KongHKU 7480/10H
Funding Information:

This study was supported by a grant from the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong (HKU 7480/10H) to L. Li. We thank Lee Stone for his helpful discussion, Gordon Wong, Diederick Niehorster, and Willie Xiang for their assistance in data collection, and three anonymous reviewers and Diederick Niehorster for their helpful comments on a previous draft.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, JCKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:40:26Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:40:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Vision, 2011, v. 11 n. 12en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/138108-
dc.description.abstractThe visual strategies for the control of steering toward a goal include aligning one's instantaneous direction of travel (i.e., heading; J. J. Gibson, 1950) or the future path (J. P. Wann & D. K. Swapp, 2000) specified by optic flow with the target, equating the time to closure of the target-heading angle with the time to passage of the target (tau equalization, B. Fajen, 2001), or using the target egocentric direction and steering to center the target in the straight ahead or cancel the target optical drift (S. K. Rushton, J. M. Harris, M. Lloyd, & J. P. Wann, 1998). Supporting evidences for the use of these strategies in guiding steering or walking toward a goal were reported, but no consensus has been reached. In this study, by presenting participants with displays in which target egocentric direction was fixed and thus unavailable for steering to force participants to rely on information from optic flow for the control of self-motion, we systematically examined the use of the optic flow-based strategies in the visual control of steering toward a goal. We found that participants steered to align their heading with the target, supporting the use of the heading strategy. We found no evidence to support the use of the path or the tau-equalization strategy in the visual control of steering toward a goal. © ARVO.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visionen_HK
dc.subjectEgocentric directionen_HK
dc.subjectHeadingen_HK
dc.subjectLocomotion controlen_HK
dc.subjectOptic flowen_HK
dc.subjectPathen_HK
dc.subjectTime to contact (tau)en_HK
dc.titleHeading but not path or the tau-equalization strategy is used in the visual control of steering toward a goalen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, L:lili@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, L=rp00636en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/11.12.20en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid22036919-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-81555209016en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros191364en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-81555209016&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume11en_HK
dc.identifier.issue12en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1534-7362-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000296800400019-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, L=26643188000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, JCK=36628221400en_HK

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