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Article: Physiological responses of two sublittoral nassariid gastropods to hypoxia
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TitlePhysiological responses of two sublittoral nassariid gastropods to hypoxia
 
AuthorsLiu, CC2
Chiu, JMY1
Li, L2
Shin, PKS2
Cheung, SG2
 
KeywordsDissolved oxygen level
Energy budget
Hong kong
Mortality
Nassarius sp.
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherInter-Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.int-res.com/journals/meps/index.html
 
CitationMarine Ecology - Progress Series, 2011, v. 429, p. 75-85 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3354/meps09107
 
AbstractAnthropogenic hypoxia of coastal bottom waters now affects hundreds of thousands of km2 worldwide. The present study investigated the physiological responses of 2 sublittoral nassariid gastropods, Nassarius conoidalis and N. siquijorensis, to hypoxia using endpoints, including scope for growth (SfG) and the related energy budget items (i.e. rate of energy intake from food, rate of energy lost to respiration and rate of energy lost to excretion) over a 31-d laboratory experiment. Our results showed that after exposure for ≥8 d, the stronger hypoxia treatment of 1.5 mg O2 l–1 significantly reduced the rate of energy intake for ­Nassarius siquijorensis, while N. conoidalis stopped feeding in the same treatment. SfG was sig­nificantly reduced in N. siquijorensis after exposure to 1.5 mg O2 l–1 during the mid and late exposure period. Exposure to ≤3 mg O2 l–1 also resulted in a negative SfG for N. conoidalis, except for the weaker hypoxia treatment during the late exposure period. Nassariid gastropods occur in great abundance in Hong Kong waters; therefore, any adverse effect on these gastropods may lead to major ecological consequences, including altered trophodynamics and disrupted nutrient recycling processes in coastal ecosystems.
 
ISSN0171-8630
2013 Impact Factor: 2.640
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3354/meps09107
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000290682100007
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, ChinaCityU 1401/06M
Funding Information:

This manuscript benefited greatly from the comments and suggestions of 4 anonymous reviewers, especially those on how to structure the Introduction section, improve the writing and interpret the data. The work described in this paper was fully supported by a grant from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (Project No. CityU 1401/06M).

 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLiu, CC
 
dc.contributor.authorChiu, JMY
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, L
 
dc.contributor.authorShin, PKS
 
dc.contributor.authorCheung, SG
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:39:36Z
 
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:39:36Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractAnthropogenic hypoxia of coastal bottom waters now affects hundreds of thousands of km2 worldwide. The present study investigated the physiological responses of 2 sublittoral nassariid gastropods, Nassarius conoidalis and N. siquijorensis, to hypoxia using endpoints, including scope for growth (SfG) and the related energy budget items (i.e. rate of energy intake from food, rate of energy lost to respiration and rate of energy lost to excretion) over a 31-d laboratory experiment. Our results showed that after exposure for ≥8 d, the stronger hypoxia treatment of 1.5 mg O2 l–1 significantly reduced the rate of energy intake for ­Nassarius siquijorensis, while N. conoidalis stopped feeding in the same treatment. SfG was sig­nificantly reduced in N. siquijorensis after exposure to 1.5 mg O2 l–1 during the mid and late exposure period. Exposure to ≤3 mg O2 l–1 also resulted in a negative SfG for N. conoidalis, except for the weaker hypoxia treatment during the late exposure period. Nassariid gastropods occur in great abundance in Hong Kong waters; therefore, any adverse effect on these gastropods may lead to major ecological consequences, including altered trophodynamics and disrupted nutrient recycling processes in coastal ecosystems.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationMarine Ecology - Progress Series, 2011, v. 429, p. 75-85 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3354/meps09107
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.3354/meps09107
 
dc.identifier.epage85
 
dc.identifier.hkuros190112
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000290682100007
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, ChinaCityU 1401/06M
Funding Information:

This manuscript benefited greatly from the comments and suggestions of 4 anonymous reviewers, especially those on how to structure the Introduction section, improve the writing and interpret the data. The work described in this paper was fully supported by a grant from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (Project No. CityU 1401/06M).

 
dc.identifier.issn0171-8630
2013 Impact Factor: 2.640
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79956062081
 
dc.identifier.spage75
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/138065
 
dc.identifier.volume429
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherInter-Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.int-res.com/journals/meps/index.html
 
dc.publisher.placeGermany
 
dc.relation.ispartofMarine Ecology - Progress Series
 
dc.rightsMarine Ecology - Progress Series. Copyright © Inter-Research.
 
dc.subjectDissolved oxygen level
 
dc.subjectEnergy budget
 
dc.subjectHong kong
 
dc.subjectMortality
 
dc.subjectNassarius sp.
 
dc.titlePhysiological responses of two sublittoral nassariid gastropods to hypoxia
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<item><contributor.author>Liu, CC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chiu, JMY</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Li, L</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Shin, PKS</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Cheung, SG</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2011-08-26T14:39:36Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2011-08-26T14:39:36Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2011</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>Marine Ecology - Progress Series, 2011, v. 429, p. 75-85</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>0171-8630</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/138065</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>Anthropogenic hypoxia of coastal bottom waters now affects hundreds of thousands of km2 worldwide. The present study investigated the physiological responses of 2 sublittoral nassariid gastropods, Nassarius conoidalis and N. siquijorensis, to hypoxia using endpoints, including scope for growth (SfG) and the related energy budget items (i.e. rate of energy intake from food, rate of energy lost to respiration and rate of energy lost to excretion) over a 31-d laboratory experiment. Our results showed that after exposure for &#8805;8 d, the stronger hypoxia treatment of 1.5 mg O2 l&#8211;1 significantly reduced the rate of energy intake for &#173;Nassarius siquijorensis, while N. conoidalis stopped feeding in the same treatment. SfG was sig&#173;nificantly reduced in N. siquijorensis after exposure to 1.5 mg O2 l&#8211;1 during the mid and late exposure period. Exposure to &#8804;3 mg O2 l&#8211;1 also resulted in a negative SfG for N. conoidalis, except for the weaker hypoxia treatment during the late exposure period. Nassariid gastropods occur in great abundance in Hong Kong waters; therefore, any adverse effect on these gastropods may lead to major ecological consequences, including altered trophodynamics and disrupted nutrient recycling processes in coastal ecosystems.</description.abstract>
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<subject>Dissolved oxygen level</subject>
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<subject>Mortality</subject>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. City University of Hong Kong