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Conference Paper: Face inversion disproportionately disrupts detection of vertical versus horizontal, not long-range versus short-range, spatial relations

TitleFace inversion disproportionately disrupts detection of vertical versus horizontal, not long-range versus short-range, spatial relations
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherPion Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://i-perception.perceptionweb.com/journal/I/
Citation
The 7th Asia-Pacific Conference on Vision (APCV 2011), Hong Kong, 15-18 July 2011. in i-Perception, 2011, v. 2 n. 4, article no. 237 How to Cite?
AbstractPresenting a face inverted disrupts sensitivity to the spacing between the features. Recent evidence suggests that inversion disproportionately affects sensitivity to vertical over horizontal changes in eye position. One explanation is that inversion disrupts the processing of long-range (e.g., eye to mouth) more than short-range (e.g., interocular) spatial relations. Here we investigated whether the size of the shift or the direction (i.e., eyes up versus eyes down; eyes in versus eyes out) affects the pattern of the inversion effect. Our results replicated the finding of poor detection of vertical changes in inverted faces (even when these changes were very large). In the vertical condition the inversion effects were just as large for the “eyes down” (short-range, as the eye-mouth distance was small) as the “eyes up” (long-range), while horizontally “eyes in” (short-range, as the eyes were very close) and “eyes out” (long-range) both produced small inversion effects. These results argue against a long-range versus short-range spatial relations explanation of the horizontal versus vertical difference in the inversion effect. Rather, it appears the axis of change rather than the spatial distances between features is behind the difference in the size of the inversion effect.
DescriptionOpen Access Journal
亞太視覺會議, APCV 2011
Posters - Face & Object Recognition: no. 237
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137999
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCrookes, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorHayward, WGen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:37:59Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:37:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 7th Asia-Pacific Conference on Vision (APCV 2011), Hong Kong, 15-18 July 2011. in i-Perception, 2011, v. 2 n. 4, article no. 237en_US
dc.identifier.issn2041-6695 (electronic)-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137999-
dc.descriptionOpen Access Journal-
dc.description亞太視覺會議, APCV 2011-
dc.descriptionPosters - Face & Object Recognition: no. 237-
dc.description.abstractPresenting a face inverted disrupts sensitivity to the spacing between the features. Recent evidence suggests that inversion disproportionately affects sensitivity to vertical over horizontal changes in eye position. One explanation is that inversion disrupts the processing of long-range (e.g., eye to mouth) more than short-range (e.g., interocular) spatial relations. Here we investigated whether the size of the shift or the direction (i.e., eyes up versus eyes down; eyes in versus eyes out) affects the pattern of the inversion effect. Our results replicated the finding of poor detection of vertical changes in inverted faces (even when these changes were very large). In the vertical condition the inversion effects were just as large for the “eyes down” (short-range, as the eye-mouth distance was small) as the “eyes up” (long-range), while horizontally “eyes in” (short-range, as the eyes were very close) and “eyes out” (long-range) both produced small inversion effects. These results argue against a long-range versus short-range spatial relations explanation of the horizontal versus vertical difference in the inversion effect. Rather, it appears the axis of change rather than the spatial distances between features is behind the difference in the size of the inversion effect.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPion Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://i-perception.perceptionweb.com/journal/I/-
dc.relation.ispartofi-Perceptionen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is retained by the author(s) of this article. This open-access article is distributed under a Creative Commons Licence, which permits noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction, provided the original author(s) and source are credited and no alterations are made.-
dc.titleFace inversion disproportionately disrupts detection of vertical versus horizontal, not long-range versus short-range, spatial relationsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailCrookes, K: kcrookes@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailHayward, WG: whayward@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHayward, WG=rp00630en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1068/ic237-
dc.identifier.hkuros191742en_US
dc.identifier.volume2-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.description.otherThe 7th Asia-Pacific Conference on Vision (APCV 2011), Hong Kong, 15-18 July 2011. in i-Perception, 2011, v. 2 n. 4, article no. 237-

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