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Conference Paper: No own-race advantage for holistic processing in Chinese participants

TitleNo own-race advantage for holistic processing in Chinese participants
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
Citation
The 11th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Naples, FL., 6-11 May 2011. In Journal of Vision, 2011, v. 11 n. 11, article no. 624 How to Cite?
AbstractRecent evidence suggests that stronger holistic processing of own-race faces may underlie the well-established own-race advantage for face memory. Across a number of studies Caucasian participants have demonstrated significantly larger holistic processing effects for Caucasian over Asian faces. However, Asian participants have shown a consistently different pattern: similar sized effects for both Asian and Caucasian faces. Here, Experiment 1 replicated these previous findings using Tanaka & Farah?s (1993) part-whole task. Caucasian Australians displayed a significantly larger whole face advantage for Caucasian than Asian faces, while Hong Kong Chinese showed no race-of-face differences in holistic processing. Additionally, we included an inverted face condition to investigate the possibility that results for Asian participants reflect a domain-general global processing bias. Results suggest that Asian participants, unlike Caucasian participants, use face-specific holistic mechanisms to process both own- and other-race upright faces. Experiment 2 used the part-whole task in conjunction with Palermo & Rhodes? (2002) flanker task. In the study phase of each trial the part-whole target was flanked by two faces. Participants performed an across-viewpoint identity-matching task (same/different) on the flanker faces while simultaneously encoding the central target. The presence of holistic processing for the flanker task is argued to disrupt holistic processing of the targets. For Caucasian participants holistic processing for own-race targets was reduced only when the flanker faces were Caucasian. For Asian participants both Asian and Caucasian flankers interfered with holistic processing for own-race targets, however no reduction in holistic processing for other-race targets was observed for either race of flankers. Results for this task again support a difference between Asian and Caucasian participants in holistic processing for other-race face. Together these results suggest that, at least for Asian participants, differences in the strength of holistic processing do not explain differences in memory for own- and other-race faces.
DescriptionOpen Access Journal
This journal issue is the 2011 meeting abstracts
Poster presentations - Face perception: High-level features: 56.304
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137996
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.341
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.042

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCrookes, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorHayward, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorFavelle, S-
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:37:58Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:37:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 11th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Naples, FL., 6-11 May 2011. In Journal of Vision, 2011, v. 11 n. 11, article no. 624en_US
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137996-
dc.descriptionOpen Access Journal-
dc.descriptionThis journal issue is the 2011 meeting abstracts-
dc.descriptionPoster presentations - Face perception: High-level features: 56.304-
dc.description.abstractRecent evidence suggests that stronger holistic processing of own-race faces may underlie the well-established own-race advantage for face memory. Across a number of studies Caucasian participants have demonstrated significantly larger holistic processing effects for Caucasian over Asian faces. However, Asian participants have shown a consistently different pattern: similar sized effects for both Asian and Caucasian faces. Here, Experiment 1 replicated these previous findings using Tanaka & Farah?s (1993) part-whole task. Caucasian Australians displayed a significantly larger whole face advantage for Caucasian than Asian faces, while Hong Kong Chinese showed no race-of-face differences in holistic processing. Additionally, we included an inverted face condition to investigate the possibility that results for Asian participants reflect a domain-general global processing bias. Results suggest that Asian participants, unlike Caucasian participants, use face-specific holistic mechanisms to process both own- and other-race upright faces. Experiment 2 used the part-whole task in conjunction with Palermo & Rhodes? (2002) flanker task. In the study phase of each trial the part-whole target was flanked by two faces. Participants performed an across-viewpoint identity-matching task (same/different) on the flanker faces while simultaneously encoding the central target. The presence of holistic processing for the flanker task is argued to disrupt holistic processing of the targets. For Caucasian participants holistic processing for own-race targets was reduced only when the flanker faces were Caucasian. For Asian participants both Asian and Caucasian flankers interfered with holistic processing for own-race targets, however no reduction in holistic processing for other-race targets was observed for either race of flankers. Results for this task again support a difference between Asian and Caucasian participants in holistic processing for other-race face. Together these results suggest that, at least for Asian participants, differences in the strength of holistic processing do not explain differences in memory for own- and other-race faces.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visionen_US
dc.titleNo own-race advantage for holistic processing in Chinese participantsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1534-7362&volume=11&issue=11&spage=&epage=&date=2011&atitle=No+own-race+advantage+for+holistic+processing+in+Chinese+participants-
dc.identifier.emailCrookes, K: kcrookes@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailHayward, W: whayward@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHayward, W=rp00630en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/11.11.624-
dc.identifier.hkuros191739en_US
dc.identifier.volume11-
dc.identifier.issue11-
dc.description.otherThe 11th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Naples, FL., 6-11 May 2011. In Journal of Vision, 2011, v. 11 n. 11, article no. 624-

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