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Conference Paper: The effect of perceptual expertise on visual short-term memory

TitleThe effect of perceptual expertise on visual short-term memory
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
Citation
The 11th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Naples, FL., 6-11 May 2011. In Journal of Vision, 2011, v. 11 n. 11, article no. 679 How to Cite?
AbstractVisual short-term memory (VSTM) capacity is larger for faces than other complex objects. Inversion reduces capacity for faces more than nonfaces (Curby and Gauthier, 2007). These findings suggest that VSTM is not influenced simply by object complexity, but also by the encoding processes employed by face experts. Previous research (Scolari, Vogel and Awh, 2008) found that perceptual expertise enhances the resolution but not the number of representations in working memory. In other words, people have a more detailed memory, instead of a larger WM capacity, for faces than nonfaces. Since we are more expert at recognizing own-race than other-race faces, we investigated whether the own-race advantage is due to a higher resolution of own-race face representations. Six study items (Chinese and Caucasian faces as well as shaded cubes) were simultaneously shown on screen on each trial. After a short delay, a single image was presented. Participants were asked to judge whether this image was the same or different from the item that originally appeared in that location. Performance of both cross-category changes (i.e. face to cube, cube to face) and within-category changes (i.e. face to face, cube to cube, color to color) was measured. Neither own-race nor other-race faces showed an inversion effect when stimuli changed between categories. However, an inversion effect was found for both own-race and other-race faces when stimuli changed within a category. These results suggest that both own-race and other-race faces are stored with high resolution in working memory.
DescriptionOpen Access Journal
This journal issue is the 2011 meeting abstracts
Poster Presentation - Face perception: Wholes and parts: 23.533
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137994
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.341
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.042

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorHayward, Wen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:37:57Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:37:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 11th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Naples, FL., 6-11 May 2011. In Journal of Vision, 2011, v. 11 n. 11, article no. 679en_US
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137994-
dc.descriptionOpen Access Journal-
dc.descriptionThis journal issue is the 2011 meeting abstracts-
dc.descriptionPoster Presentation - Face perception: Wholes and parts: 23.533-
dc.description.abstractVisual short-term memory (VSTM) capacity is larger for faces than other complex objects. Inversion reduces capacity for faces more than nonfaces (Curby and Gauthier, 2007). These findings suggest that VSTM is not influenced simply by object complexity, but also by the encoding processes employed by face experts. Previous research (Scolari, Vogel and Awh, 2008) found that perceptual expertise enhances the resolution but not the number of representations in working memory. In other words, people have a more detailed memory, instead of a larger WM capacity, for faces than nonfaces. Since we are more expert at recognizing own-race than other-race faces, we investigated whether the own-race advantage is due to a higher resolution of own-race face representations. Six study items (Chinese and Caucasian faces as well as shaded cubes) were simultaneously shown on screen on each trial. After a short delay, a single image was presented. Participants were asked to judge whether this image was the same or different from the item that originally appeared in that location. Performance of both cross-category changes (i.e. face to cube, cube to face) and within-category changes (i.e. face to face, cube to cube, color to color) was measured. Neither own-race nor other-race faces showed an inversion effect when stimuli changed between categories. However, an inversion effect was found for both own-race and other-race faces when stimuli changed within a category. These results suggest that both own-race and other-race faces are stored with high resolution in working memory.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visionen_US
dc.titleThe effect of perceptual expertise on visual short-term memoryen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1534-7362&volume=11&issue=11&spage=articel no. &epage=&date=2011&atitle=The+effect+of+perceptual+expertise+on+visual+short-term+memory-
dc.identifier.emailZhang, W: gemma.107@163.comen_US
dc.identifier.emailHayward, W: whayward@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHayward, W=rp00630en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/11.11.679-
dc.identifier.hkuros191737en_US
dc.identifier.volume11-
dc.identifier.issue11-
dc.description.otherThe 11th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Naples, FL., 6-11 May 2011. In Journal of Vision, 2011, v. 11 n. 11, article no. 679-

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