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Conference Paper: Why are face composites difficult to recognize?

TitleWhy are face composites difficult to recognize?
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
Citation
The 11th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Naples, FL., 6-11 May 2011. In Journal of Vision, 2011, v. 11 n. 11, article no. 668 How to Cite?
AbstractThe composite task is widely used in face processing to test issues of holistic processing. In this task, composite faces are formed by taking the top half of one face and pairing it with the bottom half of another. A large body of data has demonstrated that judgments of one half are affected by the identity of the irrelevant half, particularly when the two halves are aligned into the configuration of a normal face, and this interference is thought to be due to mandatory holistic processing of a face. However, very little work has been addressed at understanding the nature of the interference observed in the composite task. We examined this issue by creating composites from faces that were identical except for the spacing of the eyes. In the experiment, Chinese participants viewed Chinese and Caucasian composites (both halves of each face were always the same race), and had to judge whether the top halves of two successive composites were identical or different. The complete design of the composite task was used, so that the composite effect is demonstrated by the top/bottom congruency x alignment interaction. Top (target) halves were always identical except (on half the trials) for the spacing of the eyes; bottom halves were either identical or from different faces. The results showed a significant three-way interaction between congruency, alignment, and orientation, which demonstrated a composite effect but only for aligned, upright faces. This effect was further modified by the significant four-way interaction between congruency, alignment, orientation, and race as our Chinese participants showed a stronger congruency effect for Chinese than Caucasian faces, but again only when they were aligned and upright. These results show that in the composite task, changes in irrelevant face information interfere with the processing of configural relationships within the target region.
DescriptionOpen Access Journal
This journal issue is the 2011 meeting abstracts
Poster Presentation - Face perception: Wholes and parts: 23.522
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137993
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.341
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.042

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHayward, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorCrookes, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorFavelle, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorRhodes, Gen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:37:57Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:37:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 11th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Naples, FL., 6-11 May 2011. In Journal of Vision, 2011, v. 11 n. 11, article no. 668en_US
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137993-
dc.descriptionOpen Access Journal-
dc.descriptionThis journal issue is the 2011 meeting abstracts-
dc.descriptionPoster Presentation - Face perception: Wholes and parts: 23.522-
dc.description.abstractThe composite task is widely used in face processing to test issues of holistic processing. In this task, composite faces are formed by taking the top half of one face and pairing it with the bottom half of another. A large body of data has demonstrated that judgments of one half are affected by the identity of the irrelevant half, particularly when the two halves are aligned into the configuration of a normal face, and this interference is thought to be due to mandatory holistic processing of a face. However, very little work has been addressed at understanding the nature of the interference observed in the composite task. We examined this issue by creating composites from faces that were identical except for the spacing of the eyes. In the experiment, Chinese participants viewed Chinese and Caucasian composites (both halves of each face were always the same race), and had to judge whether the top halves of two successive composites were identical or different. The complete design of the composite task was used, so that the composite effect is demonstrated by the top/bottom congruency x alignment interaction. Top (target) halves were always identical except (on half the trials) for the spacing of the eyes; bottom halves were either identical or from different faces. The results showed a significant three-way interaction between congruency, alignment, and orientation, which demonstrated a composite effect but only for aligned, upright faces. This effect was further modified by the significant four-way interaction between congruency, alignment, orientation, and race as our Chinese participants showed a stronger congruency effect for Chinese than Caucasian faces, but again only when they were aligned and upright. These results show that in the composite task, changes in irrelevant face information interfere with the processing of configural relationships within the target region.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visionen_US
dc.titleWhy are face composites difficult to recognize?en_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1534-7362&volume=11&issue=11&spage=article no. 668&epage=&date=2011&atitle=Why+are+face+composites+difficult+to+recognize?-
dc.identifier.emailHayward, W: whayward@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCrookes, K: kcrookes@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHayward, W=rp00630en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/11.11.668-
dc.identifier.hkuros191736en_US
dc.identifier.volume11-
dc.identifier.issue11-
dc.description.otherThe 11th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Naples, FL., 6-11 May 2011. In Journal of Vision, 2011, v. 11 n. 11, article no. 668-

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