File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Conference Paper: Loris locomotor behavior in relation to skeletal morphology: disjunction between assumed mobility and utilized range of motion

TitleLoris locomotor behavior in relation to skeletal morphology: disjunction between assumed mobility and utilized range of motion
Authors
KeywordsAnthropology
Issue Date2011
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/28130
Citation
The 80th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists (AAPA 2011), Minneapolis, MN., 12-16 April 2011. In American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 2011, v. 144 n. S52, p. 155-156 How to Cite?
AbstractAn underlying assumption of many studies of primate functional anatomy is that skeletal morphology directly reflects an animal’s movement patterns. For example, expansion of humeral head is assumed to relate to greater shoulder mobility, but Chan (2008) found that passive shoulder mobility of lorises with a relative expanded humeral head is the same or less than that of lemurs. This project explores this disjunct between anatomy and range of motion by quantifying active 3D shoulder motion during slow climbing and bridging in lorises. These data are used to test the hypothesis that active, rather than passive, shoulder mobility influences shoulder morphology of lorises. We videorecorded two subjects each of Loris tardigradus (LT) (0.175-0.205kg) and Nycticebus pygmaeus (NP) (0.420-0.515kg), bridging across substrate gaps of several widths and orientations. Three-dimensional joint angles and limb positions were digitized using Innovision Systems, Inc© software to calculate excursion (flexion and abduction) of the humerus with respect to the trunk. These data were plotted on a polar coordinate system and compared to the passive range of motion reported by Chan (2008). The results showed that the excursion of the arm in both species is comparable to those used during arboreal quadrupedalism (LT mean51008; NP mean51238) which is less than the range of motion predicted lorisid skeletal morphology (LT mean52288; NP mean51718). These results suggest that previous methods of extrapolating mobility from various shoulder features, including glenohumeral skeletal morphology, are problematic and argue for cautious functional interpretation of primate fossil skeletal material.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137928
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.402
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.410

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHanna, JBen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, LKen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchmitt, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:37:09Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:37:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 80th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists (AAPA 2011), Minneapolis, MN., 12-16 April 2011. In American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 2011, v. 144 n. S52, p. 155-156en_US
dc.identifier.issn0002-9483-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137928-
dc.description.abstractAn underlying assumption of many studies of primate functional anatomy is that skeletal morphology directly reflects an animal’s movement patterns. For example, expansion of humeral head is assumed to relate to greater shoulder mobility, but Chan (2008) found that passive shoulder mobility of lorises with a relative expanded humeral head is the same or less than that of lemurs. This project explores this disjunct between anatomy and range of motion by quantifying active 3D shoulder motion during slow climbing and bridging in lorises. These data are used to test the hypothesis that active, rather than passive, shoulder mobility influences shoulder morphology of lorises. We videorecorded two subjects each of Loris tardigradus (LT) (0.175-0.205kg) and Nycticebus pygmaeus (NP) (0.420-0.515kg), bridging across substrate gaps of several widths and orientations. Three-dimensional joint angles and limb positions were digitized using Innovision Systems, Inc© software to calculate excursion (flexion and abduction) of the humerus with respect to the trunk. These data were plotted on a polar coordinate system and compared to the passive range of motion reported by Chan (2008). The results showed that the excursion of the arm in both species is comparable to those used during arboreal quadrupedalism (LT mean51008; NP mean51238) which is less than the range of motion predicted lorisid skeletal morphology (LT mean52288; NP mean51718). These results suggest that previous methods of extrapolating mobility from various shoulder features, including glenohumeral skeletal morphology, are problematic and argue for cautious functional interpretation of primate fossil skeletal material.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/28130-
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Physical Anthropologyen_US
dc.rightsAmerican Journal of Physical Anthropology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.-
dc.subjectAnthropology-
dc.titleLoris locomotor behavior in relation to skeletal morphology: disjunction between assumed mobility and utilized range of motionen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, LK: lapki@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, LK=rp00536en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ajpa.21502-
dc.identifier.hkuros189816en_US
dc.identifier.volume144-
dc.identifier.issueS52-
dc.identifier.spage155-
dc.identifier.epage156-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats