File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Breakfast skipping and change in body mass index in young children

TitleBreakfast skipping and change in body mass index in young children
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ijo/
Citation
International Journal Of Obesity, 2011, v. 35 n. 7, p. 899-906 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground/Objectives:Childhood obesity is prevalent, and dietary habits are a key determinant. Some children skip breakfast for weight control, but studies have shown mixed results. Therefore, we assessed the association between breakfast skipping and body mass index (BMI) among young Chinese children in Hong Kong.Design/Subjects and Methods:A cohort of 113 457 primary 4 participants of the Department of Health Student Health Service in 1998-2000 was followed up for 2 years, with 68 606 (60.5%) participants available for analysis in primary 6. The sociodemographic characteristics for traced and untraced participants were similar. At baseline and follow-up, students reported breakfast habit (consumed vs skipped) and other lifestyle characteristics using a standardized questionnaire. BMI was derived using height and weight measured by trained nurses. Multivariable linear regression was used to examine the cross-sectional relationship between breakfast habit and BMI, as well as the prospective association between baseline breakfast habit and change in BMI. Models adjusted for demographic, socioeconomic and lifestyle characteristics.Results:A total of 1805 (5.3%) boys and 1793 (5.2%) girls skipped breakfast at baseline. In cross-sectional analyses, breakfast skippers had a higher mean BMI than did eaters among both primary 4 (Β0.77, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.67-0.87) (P0.001) and primary 6 children (Β0.86, 95% CI: 0.78-0.95) (P0.001). Compared with eaters, baseline breakfast skippers experienced a greater increase in BMI in the subsequent 2 years (Β0.11, 95% CI: 0.07-0.16) (P0.001), and this association was stronger among lunch skippers than eaters (P for interaction0.04).Conclusion:Our study provided prospective evidence that skipping breakfast predicts a greater increase in BMI among Hong Kong children. As breakfast is a modifiable dietary habit, our results may have important implications for weight control. However, the underlying mechanism of this effect warrants further investigation. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137611
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.337
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.752
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Food and Health Bureau, Hong Kong SAR05060781
Funding Information:

This study was funded by the Health and Health Services Research Fund, Food and Health Bureau, Hong Kong SAR (05060781). We are grateful to all staff and participants of the Student Health Service for their assistance in this study. We acknowledge Anita Lai for her help with data preparation.

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTin, SPPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, SYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMak, KHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWan, KLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:29:02Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:29:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Obesity, 2011, v. 35 n. 7, p. 899-906en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0307-0565en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137611-
dc.description.abstractBackground/Objectives:Childhood obesity is prevalent, and dietary habits are a key determinant. Some children skip breakfast for weight control, but studies have shown mixed results. Therefore, we assessed the association between breakfast skipping and body mass index (BMI) among young Chinese children in Hong Kong.Design/Subjects and Methods:A cohort of 113 457 primary 4 participants of the Department of Health Student Health Service in 1998-2000 was followed up for 2 years, with 68 606 (60.5%) participants available for analysis in primary 6. The sociodemographic characteristics for traced and untraced participants were similar. At baseline and follow-up, students reported breakfast habit (consumed vs skipped) and other lifestyle characteristics using a standardized questionnaire. BMI was derived using height and weight measured by trained nurses. Multivariable linear regression was used to examine the cross-sectional relationship between breakfast habit and BMI, as well as the prospective association between baseline breakfast habit and change in BMI. Models adjusted for demographic, socioeconomic and lifestyle characteristics.Results:A total of 1805 (5.3%) boys and 1793 (5.2%) girls skipped breakfast at baseline. In cross-sectional analyses, breakfast skippers had a higher mean BMI than did eaters among both primary 4 (Β0.77, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.67-0.87) (P0.001) and primary 6 children (Β0.86, 95% CI: 0.78-0.95) (P0.001). Compared with eaters, baseline breakfast skippers experienced a greater increase in BMI in the subsequent 2 years (Β0.11, 95% CI: 0.07-0.16) (P0.001), and this association was stronger among lunch skippers than eaters (P for interaction0.04).Conclusion:Our study provided prospective evidence that skipping breakfast predicts a greater increase in BMI among Hong Kong children. As breakfast is a modifiable dietary habit, our results may have important implications for weight control. However, the underlying mechanism of this effect warrants further investigation. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ijo/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Obesityen_HK
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen_HK
dc.subject.meshChilden_HK
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshFood Habits - physiology - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshLinear Modelsen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_HK
dc.titleBreakfast skipping and change in body mass index in young childrenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, SY:syho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, SY=rp00427en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ijo.2011.58en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21448130-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79960220819en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros189370en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79960220819&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume35en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage899en_HK
dc.identifier.epage906en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000292641300003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.relation.projectA retrospective cohort study on the risk factors and outcomes of childhood obesity in Hong Kong-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTin, SPP=37035193300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SY=7403716884en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMak, KH=8623141300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWan, KL=45261609500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9081084-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats