File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Supporting collaboration with technology: Does shared cognition lead to co-regulation in medicine?

TitleSupporting collaboration with technology: Does shared cognition lead to co-regulation in medicine?
Authors
KeywordsCollaboration
Distributed cognition
Medical decision making
Simulations
Situated learning
Issue Date2012
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/sgw/cda/frontpage/0,11855,4-10030-70-52589151-0,00.html?changeHeader=true
Citation
Metacognition And Learning, 2012, v. 7 n. 1, p. 45-62 How to Cite?
AbstractThe theoretical distinctions between metacognition, self-regulation and self-regulated learning are often blurred which makes the definition of co-regulation in group learning situations even more difficult. We have started to explore co-regulation in the context of decision making in simulated emergencies where medical teams work together to manage patient cases. Our earlier work has described the relationship between collaborative decision-making in this context as well as discourse patterns that emerge in a simulated medical emergency (Lu & Lajoie, 2008). This paper examines the interactions that occur during this simulation that reflect the relationship between co-regulation and medical decision-making. There are two collaborative learning conditions, a traditional situation where the instructor facilitates collaboration by using a whiteboard to document the group's construction of a medical argument (the traditional whiteboard condition, TW). The second condition uses technology to facilitate the collaboration, where individuals use laptops and an interactive whiteboard (IW) where they can interact with the problem list as it is being created. Our assumption was that the IW would facilitate communication beyond the teacher-student, to include student-student both within and between the various subgroups. The IW group could document their medical arguments by using a structured template for constructing, annotating and sharing arguments. We found that participants in the IW condition differed from the TW condition in that they engaged in more adaptive decision-making behavior early on in the intervention. Similar overall levels of metacognitive activity were found in both conditions but the pattern and timing of metacognitive categories varied. Specifically, the IW group engaged in more planning and orienting than the TW group at the outset of the problem. Early engagement and co-regulation occurred in the IW group which led to shared understandings and subsequently to effective patient management in latter sessions (11.5% vs. 3.6% in TW). Technology supported greater metacognitive activity overall (44% vs 29% in the non supported group). Furthermore, technology facilitated greater planning (23% vs. 10%) and orienting (10% vs 1%) early in the medical problem solving activity. We refer to specific indicators in the discourse that help operationalize the concept of co-regulation. © 2011 Springer Science + Business Media, LLC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137574
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.4
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.847
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLajoie, SPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLu, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:28:11Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:28:11Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMetacognition And Learning, 2012, v. 7 n. 1, p. 45-62en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1556-1623en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137574-
dc.description.abstractThe theoretical distinctions between metacognition, self-regulation and self-regulated learning are often blurred which makes the definition of co-regulation in group learning situations even more difficult. We have started to explore co-regulation in the context of decision making in simulated emergencies where medical teams work together to manage patient cases. Our earlier work has described the relationship between collaborative decision-making in this context as well as discourse patterns that emerge in a simulated medical emergency (Lu & Lajoie, 2008). This paper examines the interactions that occur during this simulation that reflect the relationship between co-regulation and medical decision-making. There are two collaborative learning conditions, a traditional situation where the instructor facilitates collaboration by using a whiteboard to document the group's construction of a medical argument (the traditional whiteboard condition, TW). The second condition uses technology to facilitate the collaboration, where individuals use laptops and an interactive whiteboard (IW) where they can interact with the problem list as it is being created. Our assumption was that the IW would facilitate communication beyond the teacher-student, to include student-student both within and between the various subgroups. The IW group could document their medical arguments by using a structured template for constructing, annotating and sharing arguments. We found that participants in the IW condition differed from the TW condition in that they engaged in more adaptive decision-making behavior early on in the intervention. Similar overall levels of metacognitive activity were found in both conditions but the pattern and timing of metacognitive categories varied. Specifically, the IW group engaged in more planning and orienting than the TW group at the outset of the problem. Early engagement and co-regulation occurred in the IW group which led to shared understandings and subsequently to effective patient management in latter sessions (11.5% vs. 3.6% in TW). Technology supported greater metacognitive activity overall (44% vs 29% in the non supported group). Furthermore, technology facilitated greater planning (23% vs. 10%) and orienting (10% vs 1%) early in the medical problem solving activity. We refer to specific indicators in the discourse that help operationalize the concept of co-regulation. © 2011 Springer Science + Business Media, LLC.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/sgw/cda/frontpage/0,11855,4-10030-70-52589151-0,00.html?changeHeader=trueen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMetacognition and Learningen_HK
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.subjectCollaborationen_HK
dc.subjectDistributed cognitionen_HK
dc.subjectMedical decision makingen_HK
dc.subjectSimulationsen_HK
dc.subjectSituated learningen_HK
dc.titleSupporting collaboration with technology: Does shared cognition lead to co-regulation in medicine?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLu, J: jingyan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLu, J=rp00930en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11409-011-9077-5en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84858006778en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros189314en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84858006778&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume7en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage45en_HK
dc.identifier.epage62en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000303380600004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLajoie, SP=6602435220en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLu, J=24399629600en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9440170-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats