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Article: Binge drinking and axis I psychiatric disorders in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults: Results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC)
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TitleBinge drinking and axis I psychiatric disorders in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults: Results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC)
 
AuthorsChou, KL2
Liang, K2
Mackenzie, CS1
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherPhysicians Postgraduate Press, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.psychiatrist.com
 
CitationJournal Of Clinical Psychiatry, 2011, v. 72 n. 5, p. 640-647 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/JCP.10m06207gry
 
AbstractObjective: The aims of this study were to document the sociodemographic correlates of binge drinking in middleaged and older adults and to test the association of binge drinking with the occurrence of DSM-IV mood, anxiety, and alcohol use disorders; smoking; and the use of illicit drugs independently of sociodemographic variables and lifetime diagnosis of the disorder in question. Method: We conducted secondary data analyses based on a subsample of a 3-year prospective, population-based study, the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, which consisted of a nationally representative sample of 13,489 American community-dwelling adults aged 50 years and above, interviewed in both 2001-2002 and 2004-2005. This survey assessed the occurrence of 11 DSM-IV mood, anxiety, and alcohol use disorders; nicotine dependence; and the use of illicit drugs during the 3-year follow-up period by using the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism's Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-DSM-IV Version. Results: We found that, among persons aged 50 years and above, 15.6% of men and 5.7% of women reported binge drinking in the year prior to baseline assessment in 2001-2002. After adjustment was made for covariates, both men who were occasional binge drinkers and men who were frequent binge drinkers were significantly more likely than current male drinkers without binge drinking to have alcohol abuse disorder (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.90 [95% CI, 1.82-4.62] and AOR = 5.68 [95% CI, 3.79-8.51], respectively) and alcohol dependence disorder (AOR = 3.69 [95% CI, 1.75-7.75] and AOR = 9.21 [95% CI, 5.59-15.18], respectively). Similarly, after adjustment was made for covariates, both women who were occasional binge drinkers and women who were frequent binge drinkers were significantly more likely than current female drinkers without binge drinking to have alcohol abuse disorder (AOR = 4.43 [95% CI, 1.85-10.60] and AOR = 3.49 [95% CI, 1.64-7.43], respectively) and alcohol dependence disorder (AOR = 5.20 [95% CI, 1.56-17.33] and AOR = 19.47 [95% CI, 7.59-49.98], respectively). In addition, in female subjects, occasional binge drinking was associated with an increased risk of panic disorder without agoraphobia (AOR = 2.23; 95% CI, 1.01-4.91) and posttraumatic stress disorder (AOR = 2.67; 95% CI, 1.05-6.84). Conclusions: Binge drinking is strongly associated with a higher risk of alcohol use disorder in middle-aged and older adults in the United States. Results provide valuable information on the risks associated with binge drinking and suggest targets for prevention strategies for mental health in middle and old age. © Copyright 2011 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.
 
ISSN0160-6689
2013 Impact Factor: 5.139
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.258
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.4088/JCP.10m06207gry
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000291240600010
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
National Institute on Drug Abuse
Funding Information:

None for this analysis. The National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) was conducted and funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), with supplemental support from the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChou, KL
 
dc.contributor.authorLiang, K
 
dc.contributor.authorMackenzie, CS
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:27:12Z
 
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:27:12Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractObjective: The aims of this study were to document the sociodemographic correlates of binge drinking in middleaged and older adults and to test the association of binge drinking with the occurrence of DSM-IV mood, anxiety, and alcohol use disorders; smoking; and the use of illicit drugs independently of sociodemographic variables and lifetime diagnosis of the disorder in question. Method: We conducted secondary data analyses based on a subsample of a 3-year prospective, population-based study, the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, which consisted of a nationally representative sample of 13,489 American community-dwelling adults aged 50 years and above, interviewed in both 2001-2002 and 2004-2005. This survey assessed the occurrence of 11 DSM-IV mood, anxiety, and alcohol use disorders; nicotine dependence; and the use of illicit drugs during the 3-year follow-up period by using the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism's Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-DSM-IV Version. Results: We found that, among persons aged 50 years and above, 15.6% of men and 5.7% of women reported binge drinking in the year prior to baseline assessment in 2001-2002. After adjustment was made for covariates, both men who were occasional binge drinkers and men who were frequent binge drinkers were significantly more likely than current male drinkers without binge drinking to have alcohol abuse disorder (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.90 [95% CI, 1.82-4.62] and AOR = 5.68 [95% CI, 3.79-8.51], respectively) and alcohol dependence disorder (AOR = 3.69 [95% CI, 1.75-7.75] and AOR = 9.21 [95% CI, 5.59-15.18], respectively). Similarly, after adjustment was made for covariates, both women who were occasional binge drinkers and women who were frequent binge drinkers were significantly more likely than current female drinkers without binge drinking to have alcohol abuse disorder (AOR = 4.43 [95% CI, 1.85-10.60] and AOR = 3.49 [95% CI, 1.64-7.43], respectively) and alcohol dependence disorder (AOR = 5.20 [95% CI, 1.56-17.33] and AOR = 19.47 [95% CI, 7.59-49.98], respectively). In addition, in female subjects, occasional binge drinking was associated with an increased risk of panic disorder without agoraphobia (AOR = 2.23; 95% CI, 1.01-4.91) and posttraumatic stress disorder (AOR = 2.67; 95% CI, 1.05-6.84). Conclusions: Binge drinking is strongly associated with a higher risk of alcohol use disorder in middle-aged and older adults in the United States. Results provide valuable information on the risks associated with binge drinking and suggest targets for prevention strategies for mental health in middle and old age. © Copyright 2011 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Psychiatry, 2011, v. 72 n. 5, p. 640-647 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4088/JCP.10m06207gry
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.4088/JCP.10m06207gry
 
dc.identifier.epage647
 
dc.identifier.hkuros189276
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000291240600010
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
National Institute on Drug Abuse
Funding Information:

None for this analysis. The National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) was conducted and funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), with supplemental support from the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

 
dc.identifier.issn0160-6689
2013 Impact Factor: 5.139
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.258
 
dc.identifier.issue5
 
dc.identifier.pmid21294995
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79959252376
 
dc.identifier.spage640
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137526
 
dc.identifier.volume72
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherPhysicians Postgraduate Press, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.psychiatrist.com
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Psychiatry
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAlcoholism - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshAnxiety Disorders - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshHealth Surveys
 
dc.subject.meshMood Disorders - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshSubstance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
 
dc.titleBinge drinking and axis I psychiatric disorders in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults: Results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC)
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<description.abstract>Objective: The aims of this study were to document the sociodemographic correlates of binge drinking in middleaged and older adults and to test the association of binge drinking with the occurrence of DSM-IV mood, anxiety, and alcohol use disorders; smoking; and the use of illicit drugs independently of sociodemographic variables and lifetime diagnosis of the disorder in question. Method: We conducted secondary data analyses based on a subsample of a 3-year prospective, population-based study, the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, which consisted of a nationally representative sample of 13,489 American community-dwelling adults aged 50 years and above, interviewed in both 2001-2002 and 2004-2005. This survey assessed the occurrence of 11 DSM-IV mood, anxiety, and alcohol use disorders; nicotine dependence; and the use of illicit drugs during the 3-year follow-up period by using the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism&apos;s Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-DSM-IV Version. Results: We found that, among persons aged 50 years and above, 15.6% of men and 5.7% of women reported binge drinking in the year prior to baseline assessment in 2001-2002. After adjustment was made for covariates, both men who were occasional binge drinkers and men who were frequent binge drinkers were significantly more likely than current male drinkers without binge drinking to have alcohol abuse disorder (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.90 [95% CI, 1.82-4.62] and AOR = 5.68 [95% CI, 3.79-8.51], respectively) and alcohol dependence disorder (AOR = 3.69 [95% CI, 1.75-7.75] and AOR = 9.21 [95% CI, 5.59-15.18], respectively). Similarly, after adjustment was made for covariates, both women who were occasional binge drinkers and women who were frequent binge drinkers were significantly more likely than current female drinkers without binge drinking to have alcohol abuse disorder (AOR = 4.43 [95% CI, 1.85-10.60] and AOR = 3.49 [95% CI, 1.64-7.43], respectively) and alcohol dependence disorder (AOR = 5.20 [95% CI, 1.56-17.33] and AOR = 19.47 [95% CI, 7.59-49.98], respectively). In addition, in female subjects, occasional binge drinking was associated with an increased risk of panic disorder without agoraphobia (AOR = 2.23; 95% CI, 1.01-4.91) and posttraumatic stress disorder (AOR = 2.67; 95% CI, 1.05-6.84). Conclusions: Binge drinking is strongly associated with a higher risk of alcohol use disorder in middle-aged and older adults in the United States. Results provide valuable information on the risks associated with binge drinking and suggest targets for prevention strategies for mental health in middle and old age. &#169; Copyright 2011 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. University of Manitoba
  2. The University of Hong Kong