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Article: Excellent school performance at age 16 and risk of adult bipolar disorder: National cohort study

TitleExcellent school performance at age 16 and risk of adult bipolar disorder: National cohort study
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherRoyal College of Psychiatrists. The Journal's web site is located at http://bjp.rcpsych.org/
Citation
British Journal Of Psychiatry, 2010, v. 196 n. 2, p. 109-115 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Anecdotal and biographical reports suggest that bipolar disorder may be associated with high IQ or creativity, but evidence for any such connection is weak. Aims: To investigate possible associations between scholastic achievement and later bipolar disorder, using prospective data, in a whole-population cohort study. Method: Using individual school grades from all individuals finishing compulsory schooling in Sweden between 1988 and 1997, we tested associations between scholastic achievement at age 15-16 and hospital admission for psychosis between ages 17 and 31, adjusting for potential confounders. Results: Individuals with excellent school performance had a nearly fourfold increased risk of later bipolar disorder compared with those with average grades (hazard ratio HR=3.79, 95% Cl 2.11-6.82). This association appeared to be confined to males. Students with the poorest grades were also at moderately increased risk of bipolar disorder (HR=1.86, 95% Cl 1.06-3.28). Conclusions: These findings provide support for the hypothesis that exceptional intellectual ability is associated with bipolar disorder.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137513
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.06
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.674
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Department of Health/Medical Research CouncilG106-1213
Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research2013/2002
Funding Information:

J.H.M. was funded by a joint Department of Health/Medical Research Council Special Training Fellowship in Health of the Population Research (No. G106-1213). The Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research (grant No. 2013/2002) supported the study.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMacCabe, JHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLambe, MPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCnattingius, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSham, PCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDavid, ASen_HK
dc.contributor.authorReichenberg, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMurray, RMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHultman, CMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:26:52Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:26:52Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Psychiatry, 2010, v. 196 n. 2, p. 109-115en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0007-1250en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137513-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Anecdotal and biographical reports suggest that bipolar disorder may be associated with high IQ or creativity, but evidence for any such connection is weak. Aims: To investigate possible associations between scholastic achievement and later bipolar disorder, using prospective data, in a whole-population cohort study. Method: Using individual school grades from all individuals finishing compulsory schooling in Sweden between 1988 and 1997, we tested associations between scholastic achievement at age 15-16 and hospital admission for psychosis between ages 17 and 31, adjusting for potential confounders. Results: Individuals with excellent school performance had a nearly fourfold increased risk of later bipolar disorder compared with those with average grades (hazard ratio HR=3.79, 95% Cl 2.11-6.82). This association appeared to be confined to males. Students with the poorest grades were also at moderately increased risk of bipolar disorder (HR=1.86, 95% Cl 1.06-3.28). Conclusions: These findings provide support for the hypothesis that exceptional intellectual ability is associated with bipolar disorder.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoyal College of Psychiatrists. The Journal's web site is located at http://bjp.rcpsych.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Psychiatryen_HK
dc.subject.meshAchievement-
dc.subject.meshBipolar Disorder - epidemiology - psychology-
dc.subject.meshEducational Status-
dc.subject.meshEpidemiologic Methods-
dc.subject.meshIntelligence-
dc.titleExcellent school performance at age 16 and risk of adult bipolar disorder: National cohort studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSham, PC: pcsham@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySham, PC=rp00459en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1192/bjp.bp.108.060368en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20118454-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-76749090122en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros189679en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-76749090122&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume196en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage109en_HK
dc.identifier.epage115en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000275143500006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMacCabe, JH=7003607616en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLambe, MP=7004394431en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCnattingius, S=7006687777en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, PC=34573429300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDavid, AS=7402606754en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridReichenberg, A=6603720193en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurray, RM=35406239400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHultman, CM=7004101287en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike6637140-

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