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Article: Cervical scoliosis in the klippel-feil patient

TitleCervical scoliosis in the klippel-feil patient
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spinejournal.com
Citation
Spine, 2011, v. 36 n. 23, p. E1501-E1508 How to Cite?
AbstractStudy Design.: Retrospective study. Objective.: This study addressed in patients with Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS), the role of congenitally fused cervical patterns, risk factors, and cervical symptoms associated with cervical scoliosis. Summary of Background Data.: KFS is an uncommon condition, characterized as improper segmentation of one or more cervical spine segments with or without associated spinal or extraspinal manifestations. "Scoliosis" is potentially the most common manifestation associated with KFS. However, the role of congenitally fused cervical patterns along with additional potential risk factors and their association with cervical scoliosis, and its relationship with cervical spine-related symptoms remain largely unknown. Methods.: Plain radiographs were utilized to assess the location of congenitally fused cervical segments (O-T1), degree of coronal cervical alignment, and any additional cervical and thoracic spine abnormalities. The classification scheme, as proposed by Samartzis et al of congenitally fused cervical patterns (Types I-III) in KFS patients, was utilized and additional fusion and region-specific patterns were assessed. Patients with coronal cervical alignments of 10° or greater were regarded scoliotic. Patient demographics and the presence of cervical spine-related symptoms were also assessed. Results.: Thirty KFS patients were assessed (mean age, 13.5 yr). The mean coronal cervical alignment was 18.7° and scoliosis was noted in 16 patients. Patients that exhibited congenital fusion of the mid and lower cervical spine region, had multiple, contiguous congenitally fused segments (Type III), and associated vertebral malformations (e.g., hemivertebrae) were highly associated with the presence of cervical scoliosis (P < 0.05). Ten patients exhibited cervical spine-related symptoms; however, no statistically significant difference was noted between the presence of symptoms and coronal cervical alignment (P = 0.815) and cervical scoliosis (P = 0.450). Conclusion.: The study noted a prevalence of cervical scoliosis to occur in 53.3% of young KFS patients. Such patients that exhibited congenital fusion of the mid and lower cervical spine region, had multiple, contiguous congenitally fused segments (Type III), and associated vertebral malformations (e.g., hemivertebrae) were highly associated with the presence of cervical scoliosis. However, in young KFS patients, the presence of cervical scoliosis may not be associated with the manifestation of cervical spine-related symptoms. Copyright © 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137451
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.439
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.459
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSamartzis, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorKalluri, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHerman, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLubicky, JPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorShen, FHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:25:22Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:25:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSpine, 2011, v. 36 n. 23, p. E1501-E1508en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0362-2436en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137451-
dc.description.abstractStudy Design.: Retrospective study. Objective.: This study addressed in patients with Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS), the role of congenitally fused cervical patterns, risk factors, and cervical symptoms associated with cervical scoliosis. Summary of Background Data.: KFS is an uncommon condition, characterized as improper segmentation of one or more cervical spine segments with or without associated spinal or extraspinal manifestations. "Scoliosis" is potentially the most common manifestation associated with KFS. However, the role of congenitally fused cervical patterns along with additional potential risk factors and their association with cervical scoliosis, and its relationship with cervical spine-related symptoms remain largely unknown. Methods.: Plain radiographs were utilized to assess the location of congenitally fused cervical segments (O-T1), degree of coronal cervical alignment, and any additional cervical and thoracic spine abnormalities. The classification scheme, as proposed by Samartzis et al of congenitally fused cervical patterns (Types I-III) in KFS patients, was utilized and additional fusion and region-specific patterns were assessed. Patients with coronal cervical alignments of 10° or greater were regarded scoliotic. Patient demographics and the presence of cervical spine-related symptoms were also assessed. Results.: Thirty KFS patients were assessed (mean age, 13.5 yr). The mean coronal cervical alignment was 18.7° and scoliosis was noted in 16 patients. Patients that exhibited congenital fusion of the mid and lower cervical spine region, had multiple, contiguous congenitally fused segments (Type III), and associated vertebral malformations (e.g., hemivertebrae) were highly associated with the presence of cervical scoliosis (P < 0.05). Ten patients exhibited cervical spine-related symptoms; however, no statistically significant difference was noted between the presence of symptoms and coronal cervical alignment (P = 0.815) and cervical scoliosis (P = 0.450). Conclusion.: The study noted a prevalence of cervical scoliosis to occur in 53.3% of young KFS patients. Such patients that exhibited congenital fusion of the mid and lower cervical spine region, had multiple, contiguous congenitally fused segments (Type III), and associated vertebral malformations (e.g., hemivertebrae) were highly associated with the presence of cervical scoliosis. However, in young KFS patients, the presence of cervical scoliosis may not be associated with the manifestation of cervical spine-related symptoms. Copyright © 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spinejournal.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSpineen_HK
dc.subject.meshCervical Vertebrae - abnormalities - radiography-
dc.subject.meshKlippel-Feil Syndrome - complications - radiography-
dc.subject.meshScoliosis - complications - radiography-
dc.subject.meshMultivariate analysis-
dc.subject.meshRetrospective studies-
dc.titleCervical scoliosis in the klippel-feil patienten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0362-2436&volume=&spage=&epage=&date=2011&atitle=Cervical+scoliosis+in+the+Klippel-Feil+patient-
dc.identifier.emailSamartzis, D:dspine@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySamartzis, D=rp01430en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/BRS.0b013e31823145e4en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21912326-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80054910725en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros189134en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80054910725&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume36en_HK
dc.identifier.issue23en_HK
dc.identifier.spageE1501en_HK
dc.identifier.epageE1508en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000296553000001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSamartzis, D=34572771100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKalluri, P=13609327300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHerman, J=7403275959en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLubicky, JP=7004313450en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShen, FH=7201583245en_HK

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