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Article: A microscopic formulation for the actin-driven motion of Listeria in curved paths

TitleA microscopic formulation for the actin-driven motion of Listeria in curved paths
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherCell Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cell.com/biophysj/
Citation
Biophysical Journal, 2010, v. 99 n. 4, p. 1043-1052 How to Cite?
AbstractUsing a generalized Brownian ratchet model that accounts for the interactions of actin filaments with the surface of Listeria mediated by proteins like ActA and Arp2/3, we have developed a microscopic model for the movement of Listeria. Specifically, we show that a net torque can be generated within the comet tail, causing the bacteria to spin about its long axis, which in conjunction with spatially varying polymerization at the surface leads to motions of bacteria in curved paths that include circles, sinusoidal-like curves, translating figure eights, and serpentine shapes, as observed in recent experiments. A key ingredient in our formulation is the coupling between the motion of Listeria and the force-dependent rate of filament growth. For this reason, a numerical scheme was developed to determine the kinematic parameters of motion and stress distribution among filaments in a self-consistent manner. We find that a 5-15% variation in polymerization rates can lead to radii of curvatures of the order of 4-20 μm, measured in experiments. In a similar way, our results also show that most of the observed trajectories can be produced by a very low degree of correlation, <10%, among filament orientations. Since small fluctuations in polymerization rate, as well as filament orientation, can easily be induced by various factors, our findings here provide a reasonable explanation for why Listeria can travel along totally different paths under seemingly identical experimental conditions. Besides trajectories, stress distributions corresponding to different polymerization profiles are also presented. We have found that although some actin filaments generate propelling forces that push the bacteria forward, others can exert forces opposing the movement of Listeria, consistent with recent experimental observations. © 2010 by the Biophysical Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137360
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.632
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.188
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong200809159003
National Science FoundationCMMI-0825185
Brown University
Funding Information:

Y.L. is grateful for support from the Seed Funding Programme for Basic Research from The University of Hong Kong (Project No. 200809159003). V.B.S. acknowledges support through a grant from the National Science Foundation (No. CMMI-0825185) and a Solomon Faculty Research Grant from Brown University.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLin, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorShenoy, VBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHu, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorBai, Len_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:23:39Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:23:39Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBiophysical Journal, 2010, v. 99 n. 4, p. 1043-1052en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0006-3495en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137360-
dc.description.abstractUsing a generalized Brownian ratchet model that accounts for the interactions of actin filaments with the surface of Listeria mediated by proteins like ActA and Arp2/3, we have developed a microscopic model for the movement of Listeria. Specifically, we show that a net torque can be generated within the comet tail, causing the bacteria to spin about its long axis, which in conjunction with spatially varying polymerization at the surface leads to motions of bacteria in curved paths that include circles, sinusoidal-like curves, translating figure eights, and serpentine shapes, as observed in recent experiments. A key ingredient in our formulation is the coupling between the motion of Listeria and the force-dependent rate of filament growth. For this reason, a numerical scheme was developed to determine the kinematic parameters of motion and stress distribution among filaments in a self-consistent manner. We find that a 5-15% variation in polymerization rates can lead to radii of curvatures of the order of 4-20 μm, measured in experiments. In a similar way, our results also show that most of the observed trajectories can be produced by a very low degree of correlation, <10%, among filament orientations. Since small fluctuations in polymerization rate, as well as filament orientation, can easily be induced by various factors, our findings here provide a reasonable explanation for why Listeria can travel along totally different paths under seemingly identical experimental conditions. Besides trajectories, stress distributions corresponding to different polymerization profiles are also presented. We have found that although some actin filaments generate propelling forces that push the bacteria forward, others can exert forces opposing the movement of Listeria, consistent with recent experimental observations. © 2010 by the Biophysical Society.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCell Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cell.com/biophysj/ en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBiophysical Journalen_HK
dc.subject.meshActins - metabolism-
dc.subject.meshBiomechanics-
dc.subject.meshListeria - physiology-
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy - methods-
dc.subject.meshModels, Biological-
dc.titleA microscopic formulation for the actin-driven motion of Listeria in curved pathsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0006-3495&volume=99&issue=4&spage=1043&epage=1052&date=2010&atitle=A+microscopic+formulation+for+the+actin-driven+motion+of+Listeria+in+curved+paths-
dc.identifier.emailLin, Y:ylin@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLin, Y=rp00080en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bpj.2010.06.001en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20712987-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2920721-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77958195525en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros191827en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77958195525&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume99en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1043en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1052en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1542-0086-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000281103200007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, Y=7406585339en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShenoy, VB=35515368900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHu, B=37018128700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBai, L=37018053100en_HK

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