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Article: Analysis of the sacral neural crest cell contribution to the hindgut enteric nervous system in the mouse embryo

TitleAnalysis of the sacral neural crest cell contribution to the hindgut enteric nervous system in the mouse embryo
Authors
KeywordsCell Migration
Gut Explant Culture
Live Cell Imaging
Pelvic Ganglia
Issue Date2011
PublisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/gastro
Citation
Gastroenterology, 2011, v. 141 n. 3, p. 992-1002.e6 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground & Aims: The majority of the enteric nervous system is derived from the vagal neural crest, with a second contribution, which is restricted to the post-umbilical gut, originating from the sacral neural crest. In mammals, although sacral neural crest cells (NCCs) have been shown to enter the hindgut, information on their development and role remains scant. Our aim was to determine the migratory routes of sacral NCCs to the hindgut, their timing and site of entry into the gut, and their migratory behaviors and differentiation within the hindgut. Methods: We used in situ cell labeling, whole embryo culture, immunofluorescence, organotypic culture, and time-lapse live-cell imaging in mouse embryos. Results: Sacral NCCs emigrated from the neural tube at embryonic day 9.5, accumulated bilateral to the hindgut to form prospective pelvic ganglia at embryonic day 11.5, and from there entered the distal hindgut through its ventrolateral side at embryonic day 13.5. They then migrated along nerve fibers extending from the pelvic ganglia toward the proximal hindgut, intermingling with rostrocaudally migrating vagal NCCs to differentiate into neurons and glia. In organotypic culture, genetically labeled sacral and vagal NCCs displayed different capabilities of entering the hindgut, implying differences in their intrinsic migratory properties. Time-lapse live-cell imaging on explants ex vivo showed that sacral NCCs migrated along nerve fibers and exhibited different migratory behaviors from vagal NCCs. Conclusions: Murine sacral NCCs are a distinct group of cells that migrate along defined pathways from neural tube to hindgut. They exhibit discrete migratory behaviors within the gut mesenchyme and contribute neurons and glial cells to the hindgut enteric nervous system. © 2011 AGA Institute.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137211
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 18.187
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 7.170
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, ChinaCUHK4418/03M
461808
CUHK2009.1.067
Funding Information:

The work described in this paper was supported by grants from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (Project nos. CUHK4418/03M and 461808) and a CUHK Direct Grant for Research (2009.1.067).

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, AKKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSham, MHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBurns, AJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, WYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:18:59Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:18:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationGastroenterology, 2011, v. 141 n. 3, p. 992-1002.e6en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0016-5085en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137211-
dc.description.abstractBackground & Aims: The majority of the enteric nervous system is derived from the vagal neural crest, with a second contribution, which is restricted to the post-umbilical gut, originating from the sacral neural crest. In mammals, although sacral neural crest cells (NCCs) have been shown to enter the hindgut, information on their development and role remains scant. Our aim was to determine the migratory routes of sacral NCCs to the hindgut, their timing and site of entry into the gut, and their migratory behaviors and differentiation within the hindgut. Methods: We used in situ cell labeling, whole embryo culture, immunofluorescence, organotypic culture, and time-lapse live-cell imaging in mouse embryos. Results: Sacral NCCs emigrated from the neural tube at embryonic day 9.5, accumulated bilateral to the hindgut to form prospective pelvic ganglia at embryonic day 11.5, and from there entered the distal hindgut through its ventrolateral side at embryonic day 13.5. They then migrated along nerve fibers extending from the pelvic ganglia toward the proximal hindgut, intermingling with rostrocaudally migrating vagal NCCs to differentiate into neurons and glia. In organotypic culture, genetically labeled sacral and vagal NCCs displayed different capabilities of entering the hindgut, implying differences in their intrinsic migratory properties. Time-lapse live-cell imaging on explants ex vivo showed that sacral NCCs migrated along nerve fibers and exhibited different migratory behaviors from vagal NCCs. Conclusions: Murine sacral NCCs are a distinct group of cells that migrate along defined pathways from neural tube to hindgut. They exhibit discrete migratory behaviors within the gut mesenchyme and contribute neurons and glial cells to the hindgut enteric nervous system. © 2011 AGA Institute.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/gastroen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofGastroenterologyen_HK
dc.subjectCell Migrationen_HK
dc.subjectGut Explant Cultureen_HK
dc.subjectLive Cell Imagingen_HK
dc.subjectPelvic Gangliaen_HK
dc.titleAnalysis of the sacral neural crest cell contribution to the hindgut enteric nervous system in the mouse embryoen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0016-5085&volume=141&issue=3&spage=992&epage=1002.e6&date=2011&atitle=Analysis+of+the+sacral+neural+crest+cell+contribution+to+the+hindgut+enteric+nervous+system+in+the+mouse+embryo-
dc.identifier.emailSham, MH:mhsham@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySham, MH=rp00380en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1053/j.gastro.2011.06.002en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21699792-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80052109613en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros190247en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80052109613&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume141en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage992en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1002.e6en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000294281200039-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, X=50362048300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, AKK=37019606700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, MH=7003729109en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBurns, AJ=35483335400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, WY=13310314800en_HK

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