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Article: Localization of brain activation by umami taste in humans
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TitleLocalization of brain activation by umami taste in humans
 
AuthorsNakamura, Y1
Goto, TK1
Tokumori, K1
Yoshiura, T1
Kobayashi, K2
Nakamura, Y2
Honda, H1
Ninomiya, Y1
Yoshiura, K1
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/brainres
 
CitationBrain Research, 2011, v. 1406, p. 18-29 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2011.06.029
 
AbstractThere are no credible data to support the notion that individual taste qualities have dedicated pathways leading from the tongue to the end of the pathway in the brain. Moreover, the insular cortex is activated not only by taste but also by non-taste information from oral stimuli. These responses are invariably excitatory, and it is difficult to determine whether they are sensory, motor, or proprioceptive in origin. Furthermore, umami is a more unfamiliar and complex taste than other basic tastes. Considering these issues, it may be effective to minimize somatosensory stimuli, oral movement, and psychological effects in a neuroimaging study to elicit cerebral activity by pure umami on the human tongue. For this purpose, we developed an original taste delivery system for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies for umami. Then, we compared the results produced by two authorized models, namely, the block design model and event-related design model, to decide the appropriate model for detecting activation by umami. Activation by the umami taste was well localized in the insular cortex using our new system and block design model analysis. The peaks of the activated areas in the middle insular cortex by umami were very close to another prototypical taste quality (salty). Although we have to carefully interpret the perceiving intensities and brain activations by taste from different sessions, this study design might be effective for detecting the accession area in the cortex of pure umami taste on the tongue. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN0006-8993
2013 Impact Factor: 2.828
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.572
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2011.06.029
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000294141600003
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Ministry of Education, Japan19390479
Society for Research on Umami Taste
Funding Information:

This work was supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research from the Ministry of Education, Japan (19390479 to TK.G.) and Society for Research on Umami Taste (to TK.G.).

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorNakamura, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorGoto, TK
 
dc.contributor.authorTokumori, K
 
dc.contributor.authorYoshiura, T
 
dc.contributor.authorKobayashi, K
 
dc.contributor.authorNakamura, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorHonda, H
 
dc.contributor.authorNinomiya, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorYoshiura, K
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:18:05Z
 
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:18:05Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractThere are no credible data to support the notion that individual taste qualities have dedicated pathways leading from the tongue to the end of the pathway in the brain. Moreover, the insular cortex is activated not only by taste but also by non-taste information from oral stimuli. These responses are invariably excitatory, and it is difficult to determine whether they are sensory, motor, or proprioceptive in origin. Furthermore, umami is a more unfamiliar and complex taste than other basic tastes. Considering these issues, it may be effective to minimize somatosensory stimuli, oral movement, and psychological effects in a neuroimaging study to elicit cerebral activity by pure umami on the human tongue. For this purpose, we developed an original taste delivery system for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies for umami. Then, we compared the results produced by two authorized models, namely, the block design model and event-related design model, to decide the appropriate model for detecting activation by umami. Activation by the umami taste was well localized in the insular cortex using our new system and block design model analysis. The peaks of the activated areas in the middle insular cortex by umami were very close to another prototypical taste quality (salty). Although we have to carefully interpret the perceiving intensities and brain activations by taste from different sessions, this study design might be effective for detecting the accession area in the cortex of pure umami taste on the tongue. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationBrain Research, 2011, v. 1406, p. 18-29 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2011.06.029
 
dc.identifier.citeulike9488306
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2011.06.029
 
dc.identifier.eissn1872-6240
 
dc.identifier.epage29
 
dc.identifier.hkuros191407
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000294141600003
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Ministry of Education, Japan19390479
Society for Research on Umami Taste
Funding Information:

This work was supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research from the Ministry of Education, Japan (19390479 to TK.G.) and Society for Research on Umami Taste (to TK.G.).

 
dc.identifier.issn0006-8993
2013 Impact Factor: 2.828
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.572
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid21762881
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79960845610
 
dc.identifier.spage18
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137181
 
dc.identifier.volume1406
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/brainres
 
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
 
dc.relation.ispartofBrain Research
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in . Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in PUBLICATION, [VOL#, ISSUE#, (DATE)] DOI#
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshBrain - blood supply - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshBrain Mapping
 
dc.subject.meshDose-Response Relationship, Drug
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshImage Processing, Computer-Assisted
 
dc.subject.meshInosine Monophosphate - administration & dosage
 
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshNeural Pathways - blood supply
 
dc.subject.meshOxygen - blood
 
dc.subject.meshReproducibility of Results
 
dc.subject.meshSodium Glutamate - administration & dosage
 
dc.subject.meshStimulation, Chemical
 
dc.subject.meshTaste - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshTaste Threshold - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult
 
dc.titleLocalization of brain activation by umami taste in humans
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. Kyushu University
  2. Kyushu University Hospital