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Article: Trends in oral health from childhood to early adulthood: a life course approach

TitleTrends in oral health from childhood to early adulthood: a life course approach
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/COM
Citation
Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, 2011, v. 39 n. 4, p. 352-360 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to investigate trends in oral health in a cohort from late childhood through adolescence to early adulthood and to describe how the oral health of young adults was affected by their family sociodemographic characteristics, oral health status, and utilization of dental services during adolescence using life course approach. METHODS: A cohort of 638 students was followed from late childhood (12 years old) through adolescence (15 years old) to early adulthood (18 years old) in Hong Kong. Dental examinations included the assessment of caries experience (DMFT score) and periodontal conditions (Community Periodontal Index, CPI) according to WHO criteria. Information on utilization of dental services, parental education attainment, and monthly household income was collected. Path analyses were performed to investigate oral health trends and the relationships between oral health (DMFT scores and highest CPI values) at age 18 years and the sociodemographic characteristics at age 12 years, oral health, and utilization of dental services during adolescence. RESULTS: In 2004 and 2007, 395 (62%) and 324 (51%) subjects of the original sample were followed up when they reached the age of 15 and 18 years, respectively. The mean DMFT score gradually increased from 0.62 at age 12 to 1.52 at age 18 (P < 0.001). The proportion of subjects with calculus or shallow periodontal pockets (highest CPI score 2 or 3) also increased with age, from 58% at age 12 to 96% at age 18 (P < 0.001). The oral health trend path models showed that DMFT score and highest CPI value at age 18 years were positively associated with DMFT score and highest CPI value at younger ages (P < 0.05). Results of the two extended path models showed that household income had positive effect on the utilization of dental services (beta > 0.29, P < 0.05) and the utilization of dental services had positive effect on DMFT score (beta > 0.12, P < 0.05) but not for highest CPI value (P > 0.05). However, parental education attainment had no significant effect on either DMFT score or highest CPI value (P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Oral health status had become worse from childhood to early adulthood in the study cohort. Economic circumstance of the subjects was found to be positively related to their utilization of dental services and through this contributed to the subjects' caries experience. Oral health at younger ages was positively associated with succeeding oral health conditions.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137170
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.233
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.111
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLu, HXen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, MCMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLo, ECMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcGrath, CPJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:17:57Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:17:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCommunity Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, 2011, v. 39 n. 4, p. 352-360en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0301-5661en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137170-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to investigate trends in oral health in a cohort from late childhood through adolescence to early adulthood and to describe how the oral health of young adults was affected by their family sociodemographic characteristics, oral health status, and utilization of dental services during adolescence using life course approach. METHODS: A cohort of 638 students was followed from late childhood (12 years old) through adolescence (15 years old) to early adulthood (18 years old) in Hong Kong. Dental examinations included the assessment of caries experience (DMFT score) and periodontal conditions (Community Periodontal Index, CPI) according to WHO criteria. Information on utilization of dental services, parental education attainment, and monthly household income was collected. Path analyses were performed to investigate oral health trends and the relationships between oral health (DMFT scores and highest CPI values) at age 18 years and the sociodemographic characteristics at age 12 years, oral health, and utilization of dental services during adolescence. RESULTS: In 2004 and 2007, 395 (62%) and 324 (51%) subjects of the original sample were followed up when they reached the age of 15 and 18 years, respectively. The mean DMFT score gradually increased from 0.62 at age 12 to 1.52 at age 18 (P < 0.001). The proportion of subjects with calculus or shallow periodontal pockets (highest CPI score 2 or 3) also increased with age, from 58% at age 12 to 96% at age 18 (P < 0.001). The oral health trend path models showed that DMFT score and highest CPI value at age 18 years were positively associated with DMFT score and highest CPI value at younger ages (P < 0.05). Results of the two extended path models showed that household income had positive effect on the utilization of dental services (beta > 0.29, P < 0.05) and the utilization of dental services had positive effect on DMFT score (beta > 0.12, P < 0.05) but not for highest CPI value (P > 0.05). However, parental education attainment had no significant effect on either DMFT score or highest CPI value (P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Oral health status had become worse from childhood to early adulthood in the study cohort. Economic circumstance of the subjects was found to be positively related to their utilization of dental services and through this contributed to the subjects' caries experience. Oral health at younger ages was positively associated with succeeding oral health conditions.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Munksgaard. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/COMen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofCommunity Dentistry and Oral Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshPeriodontal Diseases - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshOral Healthen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshIncomeen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshEducational Statusen_HK
dc.subject.meshDental Health Surveysen_HK
dc.subject.meshDMF Indexen_HK
dc.subject.meshDental Care - utilizationen_HK
dc.subject.meshOral Healthen_HK
dc.subject.meshPeriodontal Diseases - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshSocioeconomic Factorsen_HK
dc.titleTrends in oral health from childhood to early adulthood: a life course approachen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, MCM: mcmwong@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLo, ECM: hrdplcm@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcGrath, CPJ: mcgrathc@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, MCM=rp00024en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLo, ECM=rp00015en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcGrath, C=rp00037en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1600-0528.2011.00611.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21362012-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79960365897en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros189211en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79960365897&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume39en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage352en_HK
dc.identifier.epage360en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1600-0528-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000292743800008-
dc.publisher.placeDenmarken_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcGrath, C=7102335507en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, ECM=7101705982en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, MCM=26029250900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLu, HX=45061215500en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9707553-

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