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Article: The Dutch evidential NCI: A case of constructional attrition

TitleThe Dutch evidential NCI: A case of constructional attrition
Authors
KeywordsConstructional attrition
Diachronic construction grammar
Dutch
Evidential
Nominative-and-infinitive
Issue Date2012
PublisherJohn Benjamins Publishing Co. The Journal's website is located at http://benjamins.com/catalog/jhp
Citation
Journal of Historical Pragmatics, 2012, v. 13 n. 1, p. 1-28 How to Cite?
AbstractPresent-day Dutch has two entrenched "grammatical" hearsay evidentials: a construction with zou (originally the past tense form of the verb zullen, cognate with German sollen) and a construction with schijnen (literally, 'seem'). The closest English equivalent of both constructions is the "evidential nominative and infinitive" (NCI), which pairs an evidential meaning with the morphosyntactic pattern [SBJ be Xed to Inf]. This is a highly productive construction in English, the most typical instantiation of which is be said to. Present-day Dutch has an NCI construction as well, but the lexical possibilities of this construction are limited to a handful of cognition verbs, which - in their NCI use - encode deontic rather than evidential meanings. On the basis of historical corpus data, this paper shows that the Dutch equivalent of English be said to, i.e. gezegd worden te, looked ready at one time to become entrenched as a substantive hearsay construction as well. This paper traces its evolution and explores the questions of why the pattern disappeared and why Dutch, unlike English, did not develop a schematic evidential NCI construction. © Present-day Dutch has two entrenched "grammatical" hearsay evidentials: a construction with zou (originally the past tense form of the verb zullen, cognate with German sollen) and a construction with schijnen (literally, 'seem'). The closest English equivalent of both constructions is the "evidential nominative and infinitive" (NCI), which pairs an evidential meaning with the morphosyntactic pattern [SBJ be Xed to Inf]. This is a highly productive construction in English, the most typical instantiation of which is be said to. Present-day Dutch has an NCI construction as well, but the lexical possibilities of this construction are limited to a handful of cognition verbs, which - in their NCI use - encode deontic rather than evidential meanings. On the basis of historical corpus data, this paper shows that the Dutch equivalent of English be said to, i.e. gezegd worden te, looked ready at one time to become entrenched as a substantive hearsay construction as well. This paper traces its evolution and explores the questions of why the pattern disappeared and why Dutch, unlike English, did not develop a schematic evidential NCI construction. © 2012 John Benjamins Publishing Company.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137162
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.136
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.152
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorColleman, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorNoël, Den_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-26T14:13:30Z-
dc.date.available2011-08-26T14:13:30Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Historical Pragmatics, 2012, v. 13 n. 1, p. 1-28en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1566-5852en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137162-
dc.description.abstractPresent-day Dutch has two entrenched "grammatical" hearsay evidentials: a construction with zou (originally the past tense form of the verb zullen, cognate with German sollen) and a construction with schijnen (literally, 'seem'). The closest English equivalent of both constructions is the "evidential nominative and infinitive" (NCI), which pairs an evidential meaning with the morphosyntactic pattern [SBJ be Xed to Inf]. This is a highly productive construction in English, the most typical instantiation of which is be said to. Present-day Dutch has an NCI construction as well, but the lexical possibilities of this construction are limited to a handful of cognition verbs, which - in their NCI use - encode deontic rather than evidential meanings. On the basis of historical corpus data, this paper shows that the Dutch equivalent of English be said to, i.e. gezegd worden te, looked ready at one time to become entrenched as a substantive hearsay construction as well. This paper traces its evolution and explores the questions of why the pattern disappeared and why Dutch, unlike English, did not develop a schematic evidential NCI construction. © Present-day Dutch has two entrenched "grammatical" hearsay evidentials: a construction with zou (originally the past tense form of the verb zullen, cognate with German sollen) and a construction with schijnen (literally, 'seem'). The closest English equivalent of both constructions is the "evidential nominative and infinitive" (NCI), which pairs an evidential meaning with the morphosyntactic pattern [SBJ be Xed to Inf]. This is a highly productive construction in English, the most typical instantiation of which is be said to. Present-day Dutch has an NCI construction as well, but the lexical possibilities of this construction are limited to a handful of cognition verbs, which - in their NCI use - encode deontic rather than evidential meanings. On the basis of historical corpus data, this paper shows that the Dutch equivalent of English be said to, i.e. gezegd worden te, looked ready at one time to become entrenched as a substantive hearsay construction as well. This paper traces its evolution and explores the questions of why the pattern disappeared and why Dutch, unlike English, did not develop a schematic evidential NCI construction. © 2012 John Benjamins Publishing Company.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Benjamins Publishing Co. The Journal's website is located at http://benjamins.com/catalog/jhpen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Historical Pragmaticsen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Historical Pragmatics. Copyright © John Benjamins Publishing Co.-
dc.rightsReaders of post-print must contact John Benjamins Publishing for further reprinting or re-use-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectConstructional attritionen_HK
dc.subjectDiachronic construction grammaren_HK
dc.subjectDutchen_HK
dc.subjectEvidentialen_HK
dc.subjectNominative-and-infinitiveen_HK
dc.titleThe Dutch evidential NCI: A case of constructional attritionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNoël, D: dnoel@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNoël, D=rp01170en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1075/jhp.13.1.01colen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84856850783en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros189341en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84856850783&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume13en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1en_HK
dc.identifier.epage28en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1569-9854-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000302663800001-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridColleman, T=23501302300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNoël, D=26631968500en_HK

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