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Article: Prevalence and correlates of generalized anxiety disorder in a national sample of older adults
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TitlePrevalence and correlates of generalized anxiety disorder in a national sample of older adults
 
AuthorsMacKenzie, CS1
Reynolds, K1
Chou, KL2
Pagura, J1
Sareen, J1
 
Keywordsepidemiology
Generalized anxiety disorder
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://ajgp.psychiatryonline.org/
 
CitationAmerican Journal Of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2011, v. 19 n. 4, p. 305-315 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JGP.0b013e318202bc62
 
AbstractObjectives: The objectives of this study are to provide current estimates of the prevalence and correlates of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Methods: The authors used Wave 2 data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, which included 12,312 adults 55+ and older. In addition to examining the prevalence of GAD in the past year, this study explored psychiatric and medical comorbidity, health-related quality of life, and rates of help-seeking and self-medication. Results: The past-year prevalence of GAD in this sample was 2.80%, although only 0.53% had GAD without Axis I or II comorbidity. The majority of individuals with GAD had mood or other anxiety disorders, and approximately one quarter had a personality disorder. Individuals with GAD were also more likely to have various chronic health problems although these associations disappeared after controlling for psychiatric comorbidity. Health-related quality of life was reduced among older adults with GAD, even after controlling for health conditions and comorbid major depression. Finally, only 18% of those without and 28.3% with comorbid Axis I disorders sought professional help for GAD in the past year. Self-medication for symptom relief was rare (7.2%). Conclusions: GAD is a common and disabling disorder in later life that is highly comorbid with mood, anxiety, and personality disorders; psychiatric comorbidity is associated with an increased risk of medical conditions in this population. Considering that late-life GAD is associated with impaired quality of life but low levels of professional help-seeking increased effort is needed to help individuals with this disorder to access effective treatments. © 2011 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry.
 
ISSN1064-7481
2013 Impact Factor: 3.519
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JGP.0b013e318202bc62
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000288831600002
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Manitoba
Canadian Institutes of Health Research152348
Research Grant CouncilHKU 7004-PPR20051
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
National Institute on Drug Abuse
Funding Information:

Dr. Mackenzie is supported by the University of Manitoba University Research Grants Program. Dr. Sareen is supported by a Canadian Institutes of Health Research New Investigator Award (No. 152348), and Dr. Chou is supported by the Research Grant Council (HKU 7004-PPR20051). The NESARC was conducted and funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, with supplemental support from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. We thank the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and the U.S. Census Bureau field representatives who administrated the NESARC interviews and made it available for researchers.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
GrantsIntegration of new immigrants in Hong Kong: a longitudinal investigation
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorMacKenzie, CS
 
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, K
 
dc.contributor.authorChou, KL
 
dc.contributor.authorPagura, J
 
dc.contributor.authorSareen, J
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-19T03:18:33Z
 
dc.date.available2011-08-19T03:18:33Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The objectives of this study are to provide current estimates of the prevalence and correlates of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Methods: The authors used Wave 2 data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, which included 12,312 adults 55+ and older. In addition to examining the prevalence of GAD in the past year, this study explored psychiatric and medical comorbidity, health-related quality of life, and rates of help-seeking and self-medication. Results: The past-year prevalence of GAD in this sample was 2.80%, although only 0.53% had GAD without Axis I or II comorbidity. The majority of individuals with GAD had mood or other anxiety disorders, and approximately one quarter had a personality disorder. Individuals with GAD were also more likely to have various chronic health problems although these associations disappeared after controlling for psychiatric comorbidity. Health-related quality of life was reduced among older adults with GAD, even after controlling for health conditions and comorbid major depression. Finally, only 18% of those without and 28.3% with comorbid Axis I disorders sought professional help for GAD in the past year. Self-medication for symptom relief was rare (7.2%). Conclusions: GAD is a common and disabling disorder in later life that is highly comorbid with mood, anxiety, and personality disorders; psychiatric comorbidity is associated with an increased risk of medical conditions in this population. Considering that late-life GAD is associated with impaired quality of life but low levels of professional help-seeking increased effort is needed to help individuals with this disorder to access effective treatments. © 2011 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Geriatric Psychiatry, 2011, v. 19 n. 4, p. 305-315 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JGP.0b013e318202bc62
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JGP.0b013e318202bc62
 
dc.identifier.epage315
 
dc.identifier.hkuros189273
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000288831600002
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Manitoba
Canadian Institutes of Health Research152348
Research Grant CouncilHKU 7004-PPR20051
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism
National Institute on Drug Abuse
Funding Information:

Dr. Mackenzie is supported by the University of Manitoba University Research Grants Program. Dr. Sareen is supported by a Canadian Institutes of Health Research New Investigator Award (No. 152348), and Dr. Chou is supported by the Research Grant Council (HKU 7004-PPR20051). The NESARC was conducted and funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, with supplemental support from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. We thank the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and the U.S. Census Bureau field representatives who administrated the NESARC interviews and made it available for researchers.

 
dc.identifier.issn1064-7481
2013 Impact Factor: 3.519
 
dc.identifier.issue4
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid21427639
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79953766013
 
dc.identifier.spage305
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137118
 
dc.identifier.volume19
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://ajgp.psychiatryonline.org/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
 
dc.relation.projectIntegration of new immigrants in Hong Kong: a longitudinal investigation
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAnxiety Disorders - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshHealth Surveys - statistics and numerical data
 
dc.subject.meshMental Disorders - complications - epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshPatient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics and numerical data
 
dc.subject.meshSelf Medication - statistics and numerical data
 
dc.subjectepidemiology
 
dc.subjectGeneralized anxiety disorder
 
dc.titlePrevalence and correlates of generalized anxiety disorder in a national sample of older adults
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. University of Manitoba
  2. The University of Hong Kong