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Article: Factors affecting intention to receive and self-reported receipt of 2009 pandemic (H1N1) vaccine in Hong Kong: A longitudinal study

TitleFactors affecting intention to receive and self-reported receipt of 2009 pandemic (H1N1) vaccine in Hong Kong: A longitudinal study
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
Plos One, 2011, v. 6 n. 3 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Vaccination was a core component for mitigating the 2009 influenza pandemic (pH1N1). However, a vaccination program's efficacy largely depends on population compliance. We examined general population decision-making for pH1N1 vaccination using a modified Theory of Planned Behaviour (TBP). Methodology: We conducted a longitudinal study, collecting data before and after the introduction of pH1N1 vaccine in Hong Kong. Structural equation modeling (SEM) tested if a modified TPB had explanatory utility for vaccine uptake among adults. Principal Findings: Among 896 subjects who completed both the baseline and the follow-up surveys, 7% (67/896) reported being "likely/very likely/certain" to be vaccinated (intent) but two months later only 0.8% (7/896) reported having received pH1N1 vaccination. Perception of low risk from pH1N1 (60%) and concerns regarding adverse effects of the vaccine (37%) were primary justifications for avoiding pH1N1 vaccination. Greater perceived vaccine benefits (β = 0.15), less concerns regarding vaccine side-effects (β = -0.20), greater adherence to social norms of vaccination (β = 0.39), anticipated higher regret if not vaccinated (β = 0.47), perceived higher self-efficacy for vaccination (β = 0.12) and history of seasonal influenza vaccination (β = 0.12) were associated with higher intention to receive the pH1N1 vaccine, which in turn predicted self-reported vaccination uptake (β = 0.30). Social norm (β = 0.70), anticipated regret (β = 0.19) and vaccination intention (β = 0.31) were positively associated with, and accounted for 70% of variance in vaccination planning, which, in turn subsequently predicted self-reported vaccination uptake (β = 0.36) accounting for 36% of variance in reported vaccination behaviour. Conclusions/Significance: Perceived low risk from pH1N1 and perceived high risk from pH1N1 vaccine inhibited pH1N1 vaccine uptake. Both the TPB and the additional components contributed to intended vaccination uptake but social norms and anticipated regret predominantly associated with vaccination intention and planning. Vaccination planning is a more significant proximal determinant of uptake of pH1N1 vaccine than is intention. Intention alone is an unreliable predictor of future vaccine uptake. © 2011 Liao et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137045
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Disease, Food and Health Bureau, Government of the Hong Kong SARPHE-01
Harvard Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics from the US National Institutes of Health Models of Infectious Disease1 U54 GM088558
Hong Kong University Grants CommitteeAoE/M-12/06
Funding Information:

This work received financial support from the Research Fund for the Control of Infectious Disease, Food and Health Bureau, Government of the Hong Kong SAR (grant no. PHE-01), the Harvard Center for Communicable Disease Dynamics from the US National Institutes of Health Models of Infectious Disease Agent Study program (grant no. 1 U54 GM088558), and the Area of Excellence Scheme of the Hong Kong University Grants Committee (grant no. AoE/M-12/06). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiao, Qen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, WWTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Ren_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-29T07:43:15Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-29T07:43:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPlos One, 2011, v. 6 n. 3en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137045-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Vaccination was a core component for mitigating the 2009 influenza pandemic (pH1N1). However, a vaccination program's efficacy largely depends on population compliance. We examined general population decision-making for pH1N1 vaccination using a modified Theory of Planned Behaviour (TBP). Methodology: We conducted a longitudinal study, collecting data before and after the introduction of pH1N1 vaccine in Hong Kong. Structural equation modeling (SEM) tested if a modified TPB had explanatory utility for vaccine uptake among adults. Principal Findings: Among 896 subjects who completed both the baseline and the follow-up surveys, 7% (67/896) reported being "likely/very likely/certain" to be vaccinated (intent) but two months later only 0.8% (7/896) reported having received pH1N1 vaccination. Perception of low risk from pH1N1 (60%) and concerns regarding adverse effects of the vaccine (37%) were primary justifications for avoiding pH1N1 vaccination. Greater perceived vaccine benefits (β = 0.15), less concerns regarding vaccine side-effects (β = -0.20), greater adherence to social norms of vaccination (β = 0.39), anticipated higher regret if not vaccinated (β = 0.47), perceived higher self-efficacy for vaccination (β = 0.12) and history of seasonal influenza vaccination (β = 0.12) were associated with higher intention to receive the pH1N1 vaccine, which in turn predicted self-reported vaccination uptake (β = 0.30). Social norm (β = 0.70), anticipated regret (β = 0.19) and vaccination intention (β = 0.31) were positively associated with, and accounted for 70% of variance in vaccination planning, which, in turn subsequently predicted self-reported vaccination uptake (β = 0.36) accounting for 36% of variance in reported vaccination behaviour. Conclusions/Significance: Perceived low risk from pH1N1 and perceived high risk from pH1N1 vaccine inhibited pH1N1 vaccine uptake. Both the TPB and the additional components contributed to intended vaccination uptake but social norms and anticipated regret predominantly associated with vaccination intention and planning. Vaccination planning is a more significant proximal determinant of uptake of pH1N1 vaccine than is intention. Intention alone is an unreliable predictor of future vaccine uptake. © 2011 Liao et al.en_HK
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.actionen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONEen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshInfluenza Vaccines - adverse effects - immunology - supply and distribution-
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - epidemiology - immunology - prevention and control-
dc.subject.meshIntention-
dc.subject.meshPandemics - prevention and control-
dc.subject.meshSelf Report-
dc.titleFactors affecting intention to receive and self-reported receipt of 2009 pandemic (H1N1) vaccine in Hong Kong: A longitudinal studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1932-6203&volume=6&issue=3, article no. e17713&spage=&epage=&date=2011&atitle=Factors+affecting+intention+to+receive+and+self-reported+receipt+of+2009+pandemic+(H1N1)+vaccine+in+Hong+Kong:+a+longitudinal+study-
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ:bcowling@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, WWT:wwtlam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R:fielding@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, WWT=rp00443en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFielding, R=rp00339en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0017713en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21412418-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3055876-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79952585970en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros184996-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79952585970&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume6en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000288247800026-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.relation.projectControl of Pandemic and Inter-pandemic Influenza-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiao, Q=26029481600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowling, BJ=8644765500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, WWT=7203022022en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFielding, R=7102200484en_HK

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