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Article: Resident outcomes in small-house nursing homes: A longitudinal evaluation of the Initial Green House Program

TitleResident outcomes in small-house nursing homes: A longitudinal evaluation of the Initial Green House Program
Authors
KeywordsCulture change
Longitudinal outcomes
Nursing home
Quality indicators
Quality of life
Issue Date2007
PublisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JGS
Citation
Journal Of The American Geriatrics Society, 2007, v. 55 n. 6, p. 832-839 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of a small-house nursing home model, THE GREEN HOUSE® (GH), on residents' reported outcomes and quality of care. DESIGN: Two-year longitudinal quasi-experimental study comparing GH residents with residents at two comparison sites using data collected at baseline and three follow-up intervals. SETTING: Four 10-person GHs, the sponsoring nursing home for those GHs, and a traditional nursing home with the same owner. PARTICIPANTS: All residents in the GHs (40 at any time) at baseline and three 6-month follow-up intervals, and 40 randomly selected residents in each of the two comparison groups. INTERVENTION: The GH alters the physical scale environment (small-scale, private rooms and bathrooms, residential kitchen, dining room, and hearth), the staffing model for professional and certified nursing assistants, and the philosophy of care. MEASUREMENTS: Scales for 11 domains of resident quality of life, emotional well-being, satisfaction, self-reported health, and functional status were derived from interviews at four points in time. Quality of care was measured using indicators derived from Minimum Data Set assessments. RESULTS: Controlling for baseline characteristics (age, sex, activities of daily living, date of admission, and proxy interview status), statistically significant differences in self-reported dimensions of quality of life favored the GHs over one or both comparison groups. The quality of care in the GHs at least equaled, and for change in functional status exceeded, the comparison nursing homes. CONCLUSION: The GH is a promising model to improve quality of life for nursing home residents, with implications for staff development and medical director roles. © 2007, The American Geriatrics Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137030
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.842
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.236
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKane, RAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLum, TYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCutler, LJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDegenholtz, HBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYu, TCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-29T02:14:35Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-29T02:14:35Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of The American Geriatrics Society, 2007, v. 55 n. 6, p. 832-839en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0002-8614en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137030-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of a small-house nursing home model, THE GREEN HOUSE® (GH), on residents' reported outcomes and quality of care. DESIGN: Two-year longitudinal quasi-experimental study comparing GH residents with residents at two comparison sites using data collected at baseline and three follow-up intervals. SETTING: Four 10-person GHs, the sponsoring nursing home for those GHs, and a traditional nursing home with the same owner. PARTICIPANTS: All residents in the GHs (40 at any time) at baseline and three 6-month follow-up intervals, and 40 randomly selected residents in each of the two comparison groups. INTERVENTION: The GH alters the physical scale environment (small-scale, private rooms and bathrooms, residential kitchen, dining room, and hearth), the staffing model for professional and certified nursing assistants, and the philosophy of care. MEASUREMENTS: Scales for 11 domains of resident quality of life, emotional well-being, satisfaction, self-reported health, and functional status were derived from interviews at four points in time. Quality of care was measured using indicators derived from Minimum Data Set assessments. RESULTS: Controlling for baseline characteristics (age, sex, activities of daily living, date of admission, and proxy interview status), statistically significant differences in self-reported dimensions of quality of life favored the GHs over one or both comparison groups. The quality of care in the GHs at least equaled, and for change in functional status exceeded, the comparison nursing homes. CONCLUSION: The GH is a promising model to improve quality of life for nursing home residents, with implications for staff development and medical director roles. © 2007, The American Geriatrics Society.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JGSen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American Geriatrics Societyen_HK
dc.subjectCulture changeen_HK
dc.subjectLongitudinal outcomesen_HK
dc.subjectNursing homeen_HK
dc.subjectQuality indicatorsen_HK
dc.subjectQuality of lifeen_HK
dc.titleResident outcomes in small-house nursing homes: A longitudinal evaluation of the Initial Green House Programen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLum, TY: tlum@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLum, TY=rp01513en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1532-5415.2007.01169.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17537082-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34347342809en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros198937-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34347342809&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume55en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage832en_HK
dc.identifier.epage839en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1532-5415-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000246794400004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKane, RA=7402265271en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLum, TY=8615080500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCutler, LJ=7005324016en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDegenholtz, HB=35595435600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, TC=8272692000en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike1344447-

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