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Article: Use of proxy respondents and accuracy of minimum data set assessments of activities of daily living

TitleUse of proxy respondents and accuracy of minimum data set assessments of activities of daily living
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://biomed.gerontologyjournals.org/
Citation
Journals Of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences And Medical Sciences, 2005, v. 60 n. 5, p. 654-659 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Although the Minimum Data Set (MDS) presents a wide range of opportunities for policy makers and practitioners interested in outcomes of nursing home care for frail elderly persons, researchers have debated the validity and reliability of measurements in the MDS from the outset. To investigate this issue, the authors studied the accuracy of functional assessments by comparing the MDS and interview data collected in two evaluation studies. Methods. Activities of daily living (ADL) assessment data from 3385 nursing home residents were collected from interviews with nursing home residents (n = 1200), family members (n = 1070), and nursing home staff (n = 1115). The MDS data for these nursing home residents were obtained and matched with the interview data. The agreement in ADL assessments between interview data and the MDS was assessed using Kappa statistics and multinomial logit regression for each of the three data sources. Results. The agreement on ADL assessments between MDS and interview data was low to moderate (Kappa = 0.25 to 0.52), regardless of the sources of data. Interview data from staff and family proxies agreed to a greater degree with the MDS than did data collected from nursing home residents. The MDS reported fewer ADL difficulties than did staff proxies and more ADL difficulties than did nursing home residents. These findings held even after adjustment for other confounding factors using multinomial logit regression. Conclusions. The substantial discrepancy between MDS and interview data can be attributed to both bias and error. The ADL assessments based on residents' and family or staff reports differ, but the size of these differences depends on the proxy type and the method of data collection. Copyright 2005 by The Gerontological Society of America.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137024
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.476
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.675
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLum, TYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLin, WCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKane, RLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-29T02:14:33Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-29T02:14:33Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournals Of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences And Medical Sciences, 2005, v. 60 n. 5, p. 654-659en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1079-5006en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/137024-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Although the Minimum Data Set (MDS) presents a wide range of opportunities for policy makers and practitioners interested in outcomes of nursing home care for frail elderly persons, researchers have debated the validity and reliability of measurements in the MDS from the outset. To investigate this issue, the authors studied the accuracy of functional assessments by comparing the MDS and interview data collected in two evaluation studies. Methods. Activities of daily living (ADL) assessment data from 3385 nursing home residents were collected from interviews with nursing home residents (n = 1200), family members (n = 1070), and nursing home staff (n = 1115). The MDS data for these nursing home residents were obtained and matched with the interview data. The agreement in ADL assessments between interview data and the MDS was assessed using Kappa statistics and multinomial logit regression for each of the three data sources. Results. The agreement on ADL assessments between MDS and interview data was low to moderate (Kappa = 0.25 to 0.52), regardless of the sources of data. Interview data from staff and family proxies agreed to a greater degree with the MDS than did data collected from nursing home residents. The MDS reported fewer ADL difficulties than did staff proxies and more ADL difficulties than did nursing home residents. These findings held even after adjustment for other confounding factors using multinomial logit regression. Conclusions. The substantial discrepancy between MDS and interview data can be attributed to both bias and error. The ADL assessments based on residents' and family or staff reports differ, but the size of these differences depends on the proxy type and the method of data collection. Copyright 2005 by The Gerontological Society of America.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://biomed.gerontologyjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciencesen_HK
dc.titleUse of proxy respondents and accuracy of minimum data set assessments of activities of daily livingen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLum, TY: tlum@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLum, TY=rp01513en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid15972620en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-20544459390en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-20544459390&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume60en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage654en_HK
dc.identifier.epage659en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000229921200024-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLum, TY=8615080500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, WC=8615080600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKane, RL=35334634400en_HK

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