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Conference Paper: Perinatal bereavement: grieving pregnancy loss in miscarriage and stillbirth

TitlePerinatal bereavement: grieving pregnancy loss in miscarriage and stillbirth
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherHong Kong Society of Palliative Medicine.
Citation
The 8th Hong Kong Palliative Care Symposium, Hong Kong, 20 August 2011. In Newsletter of Hong Kong Society of Palliative Medicine, 2011, n. 2, p. 10 How to Cite?
AbstractMany couples have experienced the death of a baby. It could happen during pregnancy, during delivery, shortly after birth, or during infancy. Some are unexpected: in spite of medical advances, more than one-fifth of all expectant parents will at some time experience miscarriage, stillbirth or infant death. For some other couples, early termination, whether of unwanted pregnancies due to personal choice or of wanted pregnancies due to medical reasons, is carried out at their own decision. A couple’s experience of loss in miscarriage and stillbirth is not easily shared by others – “but it wasn’t even a baby yet.” The lack of clarity of the loss (in the absence of a touchable, separate infant’s body) is the reason for many who find it difficult to appreciate the full extent of grief in pregnancy loss. Couples who have miscarriage and stillbirth are also confused about their bereavement experience and sometimes not sure about how to react. As a result, many of them choose not to seek help and support from their family and friends; the couple does not know how to name the grief, neither do those who are close to them know how to respond. In Chinese societies, expectant mothers do not disclose their pregnancy during the first trimester for the traditional fear that it would jinx or ‘upset’ the baby, who would then ‘refuse to be born’. Pregnancy loss during this early stage, while not uncommon, will be a secret within a secret, further complicating the grief process. In essence, pregnancy loss due to miscarriage or stillbirth is always considered as disenfranchised grief over an ambiguous loss. Cultural considerations are important in helping the Chinese couples who are facing the losses.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/136539

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, CHYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T02:18:13Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T02:18:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 8th Hong Kong Palliative Care Symposium, Hong Kong, 20 August 2011. In Newsletter of Hong Kong Society of Palliative Medicine, 2011, n. 2, p. 10en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/136539-
dc.description.abstractMany couples have experienced the death of a baby. It could happen during pregnancy, during delivery, shortly after birth, or during infancy. Some are unexpected: in spite of medical advances, more than one-fifth of all expectant parents will at some time experience miscarriage, stillbirth or infant death. For some other couples, early termination, whether of unwanted pregnancies due to personal choice or of wanted pregnancies due to medical reasons, is carried out at their own decision. A couple’s experience of loss in miscarriage and stillbirth is not easily shared by others – “but it wasn’t even a baby yet.” The lack of clarity of the loss (in the absence of a touchable, separate infant’s body) is the reason for many who find it difficult to appreciate the full extent of grief in pregnancy loss. Couples who have miscarriage and stillbirth are also confused about their bereavement experience and sometimes not sure about how to react. As a result, many of them choose not to seek help and support from their family and friends; the couple does not know how to name the grief, neither do those who are close to them know how to respond. In Chinese societies, expectant mothers do not disclose their pregnancy during the first trimester for the traditional fear that it would jinx or ‘upset’ the baby, who would then ‘refuse to be born’. Pregnancy loss during this early stage, while not uncommon, will be a secret within a secret, further complicating the grief process. In essence, pregnancy loss due to miscarriage or stillbirth is always considered as disenfranchised grief over an ambiguous loss. Cultural considerations are important in helping the Chinese couples who are facing the losses.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherHong Kong Society of Palliative Medicine.-
dc.relation.ispartofNewsletter of Hong Kong Society of Palliative Medicineen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titlePerinatal bereavement: grieving pregnancy loss in miscarriage and stillbirthen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, CHY: chancelia@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CHY=rp00498en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros186396en_US
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage10-
dc.identifier.epage10-
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong-

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