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Article: Junk trade, businesss networks and sojourning communities: Hokkien merchants in early maritime Asia

TitleJunk trade, businesss networks and sojourning communities: Hokkien merchants in early maritime Asia
Authors
KeywordsHokkien merchants
junk trade
Maritime Asia
networks
sojourning community
Issue Date2010
PublisherBrill. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nus.edu.sg/npu/jco/index.html
Citation
Journal Of Chinese Overseas, 2010, v. 6 n. 2, p. 157-215 How to Cite?
AbstractThe people of south Fujian, better known as "Hokkiens," have a long seafaring tradition. Isolated on the remote southeastern periphery of China, they cast their eyes on the territories beyond the sea as early as the 10th century. Sporadic records suggest that Hokkien merchants were actively engaged in trading at emporia ranging from Korea in the north to Sumatra in the south. With the development of maritime trade, they started to sojourn overseas, and some of them even stayed abroad for a very long period. Hokkien merchants were known for their commercial acumen and ability to adapt to different environments abroad. Nevertheless, they still frequently relied on various institutional mechanisms to protect or advance their commercial interests. Invariably they were very creative in establishing business institutions and forming different ethnic networks. Apart from developing a wide spectrum of networks in their daily business practice, they showed various cultural characteristics that differentiated them from other Chinese merchants. As the most daring entrepreneurial group in early modern Asia, Hokkien merchants performed quite well in early maritime Asia. But as a marginal trade group, their status in overseas society was always subordinate despite their commercial success. This article examines the early Hokkien commercial activities in a number of the major port polities of Asia, with a focus on the Hokkien sojourning communities in Korea, Kyushu, Taiwan and Manila, and their unique networks and culture. © 2010 Brill.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/136339
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.117
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChin, JKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T02:13:47Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T02:13:47Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Chinese Overseas, 2010, v. 6 n. 2, p. 157-215en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1793-0391en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/136339-
dc.description.abstractThe people of south Fujian, better known as "Hokkiens," have a long seafaring tradition. Isolated on the remote southeastern periphery of China, they cast their eyes on the territories beyond the sea as early as the 10th century. Sporadic records suggest that Hokkien merchants were actively engaged in trading at emporia ranging from Korea in the north to Sumatra in the south. With the development of maritime trade, they started to sojourn overseas, and some of them even stayed abroad for a very long period. Hokkien merchants were known for their commercial acumen and ability to adapt to different environments abroad. Nevertheless, they still frequently relied on various institutional mechanisms to protect or advance their commercial interests. Invariably they were very creative in establishing business institutions and forming different ethnic networks. Apart from developing a wide spectrum of networks in their daily business practice, they showed various cultural characteristics that differentiated them from other Chinese merchants. As the most daring entrepreneurial group in early modern Asia, Hokkien merchants performed quite well in early maritime Asia. But as a marginal trade group, their status in overseas society was always subordinate despite their commercial success. This article examines the early Hokkien commercial activities in a number of the major port polities of Asia, with a focus on the Hokkien sojourning communities in Korea, Kyushu, Taiwan and Manila, and their unique networks and culture. © 2010 Brill.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBrill. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nus.edu.sg/npu/jco/index.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Chinese Overseasen_HK
dc.subjectHokkien merchantsen_HK
dc.subjectjunk tradeen_HK
dc.subjectMaritime Asiaen_HK
dc.subjectnetworksen_HK
dc.subjectsojourning communityen_HK
dc.titleJunk trade, businesss networks and sojourning communities: Hokkien merchants in early maritime Asiaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChin, JK: qianj@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChin, JK=rp00853en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1163/179325410X526104en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78649758288en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros186618en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78649758288&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume6en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage157en_HK
dc.identifier.epage215en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1793-2548-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK

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