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Article: Urban renewal in Hong Kong: a community aspiration study
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TitleUrban renewal in Hong Kong: a community aspiration study
 
AuthorsHo, DCW
Yau, Y
Poon, SW
Law, CK
Chui, EWT
Wong, YC
Lee, KM
Ko, LSF
Yip, HK
Kwan, AKH
Wong, KHY
 
KeywordsUrban renewal
Sustainable development
Community aspiration
Community engagement
Hong Kong
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherHong Kong Institute of Surveyors. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkis.org.hk/en/publication_journal.php
 
CitationSurveying & Built Environment, 2011, v. 21 n. 1, p. 63-77 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractCoupled with the growing number of aged private residential buildings, the lack of proper building care culture has led to serious problems of building dilapidation and urban decay in Hong Kong, particularly in the old urban areas. Not only is the cityscape ruined, but also the health and safety of the residents and general public as a whole are jeopardized. To arrest urban decay, redevelopment has long been adopted to renew rundown areas. However, the approach usually has a negative impact on the existing social fabric and causes a reduction in social capital. Given that older buildings usually have a larger proportion of older residents, and that the elderly population tends to be financially less well-off, this group of residents is more adversely affected by the negative impact of social destruction due to redevelopment. Recently, building rehabilitation has been gaining popularity. Yet, with a view to a sustainable strategy for urban renewal, it is necessary to balance the interests of different stakeholders. The alternative ways the community perceives different approaches to urban renewal in Hong Kong is a worthwhile topic to study. In this paper, the community's attitudes towards redevelopment and rehabilitation as urban renewal options are examined through a structured questionnaire survey. The survey findings are discussed with emphases on their policy implications. Recommendations will be drawn with respect to the community engagement process that enhances the likelihood of arriving at a more balanced urban renewal strategy.
 
ISSN1816-9554
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorHo, DCW
 
dc.contributor.authorYau, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorPoon, SW
 
dc.contributor.authorLaw, CK
 
dc.contributor.authorChui, EWT
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, YC
 
dc.contributor.authorLee, KM
 
dc.contributor.authorKo, LSF
 
dc.contributor.authorYip, HK
 
dc.contributor.authorKwan, AKH
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, KHY
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T02:13:04Z
 
dc.date.available2011-07-27T02:13:04Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractCoupled with the growing number of aged private residential buildings, the lack of proper building care culture has led to serious problems of building dilapidation and urban decay in Hong Kong, particularly in the old urban areas. Not only is the cityscape ruined, but also the health and safety of the residents and general public as a whole are jeopardized. To arrest urban decay, redevelopment has long been adopted to renew rundown areas. However, the approach usually has a negative impact on the existing social fabric and causes a reduction in social capital. Given that older buildings usually have a larger proportion of older residents, and that the elderly population tends to be financially less well-off, this group of residents is more adversely affected by the negative impact of social destruction due to redevelopment. Recently, building rehabilitation has been gaining popularity. Yet, with a view to a sustainable strategy for urban renewal, it is necessary to balance the interests of different stakeholders. The alternative ways the community perceives different approaches to urban renewal in Hong Kong is a worthwhile topic to study. In this paper, the community's attitudes towards redevelopment and rehabilitation as urban renewal options are examined through a structured questionnaire survey. The survey findings are discussed with emphases on their policy implications. Recommendations will be drawn with respect to the community engagement process that enhances the likelihood of arriving at a more balanced urban renewal strategy.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationSurveying & Built Environment, 2011, v. 21 n. 1, p. 63-77 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage77
 
dc.identifier.hkuros188526
 
dc.identifier.issn1816-9554
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.spage63
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/136314
 
dc.identifier.volume21
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherHong Kong Institute of Surveyors. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkis.org.hk/en/publication_journal.php
 
dc.publisher.placeHong Kong
 
dc.relation.ispartofSurveying & Built Environment
 
dc.subjectUrban renewal
 
dc.subjectSustainable development
 
dc.subjectCommunity aspiration
 
dc.subjectCommunity engagement
 
dc.subjectHong Kong
 
dc.titleUrban renewal in Hong Kong: a community aspiration study
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Chui, EWT</contributor.author>
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