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Article: Phenolic tyrosinase inhibitors from the stems of Cudrania cochinchinensis
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TitlePhenolic tyrosinase inhibitors from the stems of Cudrania cochinchinensis
 
AuthorsZheng, ZP1
Zhu, Q1
Fan, CL2
Tan, HY1
Wang, M1
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherRoyal Society of Chemistry. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.rsc.org/en/journals/journalissues/fo
 
CitationFood And Function, 2011, v. 2 n. 5, p. 259-264 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c1fo10033e
 
AbstractThe phytochemcal profiles of Cudrania cochinchinensis leaf, twig, stem and root were compared by HPLC analysis. It was found that C. cochinchinensis stem extract contained some unknown natural products with potential tyrosinase inhibitory activities. Therefore, the chemical constitutes in extract (95% ethanol) of C. cochinchinensis stem were further investigated in this study. A new racemic mixture, (±)2,3-cis-dihydromorin, and fifteen known phenolic compounds, dihydrokaempferol 7-O-β-d-qlucopyranoside, skimmin, quercetin-7-O-β-d-glucoside, 2,3-dihydroquercetin 7-O-β-d-glucoside, kaempferol-7-O-β-glucopyranoside, quercetin-3,7-di-O-β-d-glucoside, morin-7-O-β-d-glucoside, 1,3,5,8-tetrahydroxyxanthen-9-one, 2,3-trans-dihydromorin, aromadendrin, oxyresveratrol, genistin, protocatechuic acid, kaempferol 3,7-di-O-β-glucopyranoside, and naringenin were isolated. Spectral techniques (MS, 1H NMR and 13C NMR) were utilized for their structural identification and their inhibitory activities on mushroom tyrosinase were also evaluated. The results showed that tyrosinase inhibitory activities of (±)2,3-cis-dihydromorin (IC 50 = 31.1 μM), 2,3-trans-dihydromorin (IC 50 = 21.1 μM), and oxyresveratrol (IC 50 = 2.33 μM), were more potent than that of kojic acid (IC 50 = 50.8 μM), a well-known tyrosinase inhibitor, indicating that Cudrania cochinchinensis stem will be a great potential agent for the development of effective natural tyrosinase inhibitors. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.
 
ISSN2042-6496
2012 Impact Factor: 2.694
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c1fo10033e
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000291039200005
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorZheng, ZP
 
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Q
 
dc.contributor.authorFan, CL
 
dc.contributor.authorTan, HY
 
dc.contributor.authorWang, M
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T02:11:39Z
 
dc.date.available2011-07-27T02:11:39Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractThe phytochemcal profiles of Cudrania cochinchinensis leaf, twig, stem and root were compared by HPLC analysis. It was found that C. cochinchinensis stem extract contained some unknown natural products with potential tyrosinase inhibitory activities. Therefore, the chemical constitutes in extract (95% ethanol) of C. cochinchinensis stem were further investigated in this study. A new racemic mixture, (±)2,3-cis-dihydromorin, and fifteen known phenolic compounds, dihydrokaempferol 7-O-β-d-qlucopyranoside, skimmin, quercetin-7-O-β-d-glucoside, 2,3-dihydroquercetin 7-O-β-d-glucoside, kaempferol-7-O-β-glucopyranoside, quercetin-3,7-di-O-β-d-glucoside, morin-7-O-β-d-glucoside, 1,3,5,8-tetrahydroxyxanthen-9-one, 2,3-trans-dihydromorin, aromadendrin, oxyresveratrol, genistin, protocatechuic acid, kaempferol 3,7-di-O-β-glucopyranoside, and naringenin were isolated. Spectral techniques (MS, 1H NMR and 13C NMR) were utilized for their structural identification and their inhibitory activities on mushroom tyrosinase were also evaluated. The results showed that tyrosinase inhibitory activities of (±)2,3-cis-dihydromorin (IC 50 = 31.1 μM), 2,3-trans-dihydromorin (IC 50 = 21.1 μM), and oxyresveratrol (IC 50 = 2.33 μM), were more potent than that of kojic acid (IC 50 = 50.8 μM), a well-known tyrosinase inhibitor, indicating that Cudrania cochinchinensis stem will be a great potential agent for the development of effective natural tyrosinase inhibitors. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationFood And Function, 2011, v. 2 n. 5, p. 259-264 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c1fo10033e
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c1fo10033e
 
dc.identifier.epage264
 
dc.identifier.hkuros186786
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000291039200005
 
dc.identifier.issn2042-6496
2012 Impact Factor: 2.694
 
dc.identifier.issue5
 
dc.identifier.pmid21779564
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79957860606
 
dc.identifier.spage259
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/136245
 
dc.identifier.volume2
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherRoyal Society of Chemistry. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.rsc.org/en/journals/journalissues/fo
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofFood and Function
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshEnzyme Inhibitors - pharmacology
 
dc.subject.meshMonophenol Monooxygenase - metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshMoraceae - chemistry
 
dc.subject.meshPhenols - pharmacology
 
dc.subject.meshPlant Stems - chemistry
 
dc.titlePhenolic tyrosinase inhibitors from the stems of Cudrania cochinchinensis
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<description.abstract>The phytochemcal profiles of Cudrania cochinchinensis leaf, twig, stem and root were compared by HPLC analysis. It was found that C. cochinchinensis stem extract contained some unknown natural products with potential tyrosinase inhibitory activities. Therefore, the chemical constitutes in extract (95% ethanol) of C. cochinchinensis stem were further investigated in this study. A new racemic mixture, (&#177;)2,3-cis-dihydromorin, and fifteen known phenolic compounds, dihydrokaempferol 7-O-&#946;-d-qlucopyranoside, skimmin, quercetin-7-O-&#946;-d-glucoside, 2,3-dihydroquercetin 7-O-&#946;-d-glucoside, kaempferol-7-O-&#946;-glucopyranoside, quercetin-3,7-di-O-&#946;-d-glucoside, morin-7-O-&#946;-d-glucoside, 1,3,5,8-tetrahydroxyxanthen-9-one, 2,3-trans-dihydromorin, aromadendrin, oxyresveratrol, genistin, protocatechuic acid, kaempferol 3,7-di-O-&#946;-glucopyranoside, and naringenin were isolated. Spectral techniques (MS, 1H NMR and 13C NMR) were utilized for their structural identification and their inhibitory activities on mushroom tyrosinase were also evaluated. The results showed that tyrosinase inhibitory activities of (&#177;)2,3-cis-dihydromorin (IC 50 = 31.1 &#956;M), 2,3-trans-dihydromorin (IC 50 = 21.1 &#956;M), and oxyresveratrol (IC 50 = 2.33 &#956;M), were more potent than that of kojic acid (IC 50 = 50.8 &#956;M), a well-known tyrosinase inhibitor, indicating that Cudrania cochinchinensis stem will be a great potential agent for the development of effective natural tyrosinase inhibitors. &#169; 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Jinan University