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Article: Protective actions of microalgae against endogenous and exogenous advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) in human retinal pigment epithelial cells
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TitleProtective actions of microalgae against endogenous and exogenous advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) in human retinal pigment epithelial cells
 
AuthorsSun, Z1
Liu, J1
Zeng, X1
Huangfu, J1
Jiang, Y2
Wang, M1
Chen, F1 3
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherRoyal Society of Chemistry. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.rsc.org/en/journals/journalissues/fo
 
CitationFood And Function, 2011, v. 2 n. 5, p. 251-258 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c1fo10021a
 
AbstractThe formation and accumulation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) is a key pathophysiological process involved in various diabetic complications such as diabetic retinopathy. In the present study, for the first time, protective effects of three microalgal strains, including their extracts and active compounds, against both endogenous and exogenous AGEs in cell-based models were investigated. Results showed that in cultured human-derived retinal pigment epithelial ARPE-19 cells, the extract of Chlorella zofingiensis and its nutritional ingredient astaxanthin exhibited significant inhibitory effects on the formation of endogenous N ε-carboxymethyllysine (CML), a key AGE representative, through the suppression of intracellular oxidative stress. On the other hand, extracts of Chlorella zofingiensis, Chlorella protothecoides and Nitzschia laevis as well as their nutritional ingredients, namely astaxanthin, lutein and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), attenuated the deleterious effects induced by exogenous AGEs, such as cell proliferation and mRNA upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2, which are critical steps involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. These results suggested the positive roles of astaxanthin, lutein and EPA in controlling the development of diabetes. These microalgae, therefore, might be regarded as beneficial foods and preventive agent choices for patients with diabetic retinopathy. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.
 
ISSN2042-6496
2013 Impact Factor: 2.907
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c1fo10021a
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000291039200004
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorSun, Z
 
dc.contributor.authorLiu, J
 
dc.contributor.authorZeng, X
 
dc.contributor.authorHuangfu, J
 
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorWang, M
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, F
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T02:11:38Z
 
dc.date.available2011-07-27T02:11:38Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractThe formation and accumulation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) is a key pathophysiological process involved in various diabetic complications such as diabetic retinopathy. In the present study, for the first time, protective effects of three microalgal strains, including their extracts and active compounds, against both endogenous and exogenous AGEs in cell-based models were investigated. Results showed that in cultured human-derived retinal pigment epithelial ARPE-19 cells, the extract of Chlorella zofingiensis and its nutritional ingredient astaxanthin exhibited significant inhibitory effects on the formation of endogenous N ε-carboxymethyllysine (CML), a key AGE representative, through the suppression of intracellular oxidative stress. On the other hand, extracts of Chlorella zofingiensis, Chlorella protothecoides and Nitzschia laevis as well as their nutritional ingredients, namely astaxanthin, lutein and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), attenuated the deleterious effects induced by exogenous AGEs, such as cell proliferation and mRNA upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2, which are critical steps involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. These results suggested the positive roles of astaxanthin, lutein and EPA in controlling the development of diabetes. These microalgae, therefore, might be regarded as beneficial foods and preventive agent choices for patients with diabetic retinopathy. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationFood And Function, 2011, v. 2 n. 5, p. 251-258 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c1fo10021a
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c1fo10021a
 
dc.identifier.epage258
 
dc.identifier.hkuros186785
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000291039200004
 
dc.identifier.issn2042-6496
2013 Impact Factor: 2.907
 
dc.identifier.issue5
 
dc.identifier.pmid21779563
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79957808756
 
dc.identifier.spage251
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/136244
 
dc.identifier.volume2
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherRoyal Society of Chemistry. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.rsc.org/en/journals/journalissues/fo
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofFood and Function
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshDiabetic Retinopathy - drug therapy - etiology - pathology
 
dc.subject.meshEicosapentaenoic Acid - pharmacology
 
dc.subject.meshGlycosylation End Products, Advanced - adverse effects - metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshLutein - pharmacology
 
dc.subject.meshMicroalgae - chemistry
 
dc.titleProtective actions of microalgae against endogenous and exogenous advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) in human retinal pigment epithelial cells
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Jiang, Y</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wang, M</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chen, F</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>The formation and accumulation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) is a key pathophysiological process involved in various diabetic complications such as diabetic retinopathy. In the present study, for the first time, protective effects of three microalgal strains, including their extracts and active compounds, against both endogenous and exogenous AGEs in cell-based models were investigated. Results showed that in cultured human-derived retinal pigment epithelial ARPE-19 cells, the extract of Chlorella zofingiensis and its nutritional ingredient astaxanthin exhibited significant inhibitory effects on the formation of endogenous N &#949;-carboxymethyllysine (CML), a key AGE representative, through the suppression of intracellular oxidative stress. On the other hand, extracts of Chlorella zofingiensis, Chlorella protothecoides and Nitzschia laevis as well as their nutritional ingredients, namely astaxanthin, lutein and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), attenuated the deleterious effects induced by exogenous AGEs, such as cell proliferation and mRNA upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2, which are critical steps involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. These results suggested the positive roles of astaxanthin, lutein and EPA in controlling the development of diabetes. These microalgae, therefore, might be regarded as beneficial foods and preventive agent choices for patients with diabetic retinopathy. &#169; 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Hong Kong Baptist University
  3. Peking University