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Conference Paper: Effects of invisible flankers on invisible adaptor

TitleEffects of invisible flankers on invisible adaptor
Authors
KeywordsPsychology medical sciences
Ophthalmology and optometry
Issue Date2011
PublisherPion Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.perceptionweb.com
Citation
The 34th European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP 2011), Toulouse, France, 11 August 2011. In Perception, 2011, v. 40 abstract suppl., p. 34 How to Cite?
AbstractThe strength of early adaptation was shown to be reduced by binocular suppression and crowding [Blake et al, 2006 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA 103(12) 4783–4788]. Such reduction was explained as the effects of visual awareness on adaptation. Here we investigated whether flankers could further weaken adaptation when stimuli were rendered perceptually invisible by continuous flash suppression. Four normally sighted observers viewed an adapting grating (4×contrast threshold; 2.5° diameter; 2 cpd) presented to the upper visual field of their non-dominant eye at 10° eccentricity for 5 s. The adaptor was surrounded by four high contrast flankers (8×contrast threshold; 2.7° center-to-center distance) in the crowded conditions. Perceptual visibility of the adaptor (and flankers) was modulated by presenting dynamic noise to their dominant eye. Contrast thresholds for two-interval-forced-choice detection were measured with test gratings in same or orthogonal orientation. The strength of orientation-specific threshold-elevation aftereffect was reduced when the adaptor was flanked. More importantly, attenuated effect of flankers was observed even when both the adaptor and flankers were suppressed from awareness. Flanker interference reduced the strength of early adaptation, regardless of visual awareness. Such interference on neural activity early in visual processing at the site of adaptation was likely to be a bottom-up phenomenon.
DescriptionTalks 6 : Crowding
Open URL - http://www.perceptionweb.com/abstract.cgi?id=v110150
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/136195
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.917
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.518

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, SH-
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T02:04:25Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T02:04:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 34th European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP 2011), Toulouse, France, 11 August 2011. In Perception, 2011, v. 40 abstract suppl., p. 34en_US
dc.identifier.issn0301-0066-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/136195-
dc.descriptionTalks 6 : Crowding-
dc.descriptionOpen URL - http://www.perceptionweb.com/abstract.cgi?id=v110150-
dc.description.abstractThe strength of early adaptation was shown to be reduced by binocular suppression and crowding [Blake et al, 2006 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA 103(12) 4783–4788]. Such reduction was explained as the effects of visual awareness on adaptation. Here we investigated whether flankers could further weaken adaptation when stimuli were rendered perceptually invisible by continuous flash suppression. Four normally sighted observers viewed an adapting grating (4×contrast threshold; 2.5° diameter; 2 cpd) presented to the upper visual field of their non-dominant eye at 10° eccentricity for 5 s. The adaptor was surrounded by four high contrast flankers (8×contrast threshold; 2.7° center-to-center distance) in the crowded conditions. Perceptual visibility of the adaptor (and flankers) was modulated by presenting dynamic noise to their dominant eye. Contrast thresholds for two-interval-forced-choice detection were measured with test gratings in same or orthogonal orientation. The strength of orientation-specific threshold-elevation aftereffect was reduced when the adaptor was flanked. More importantly, attenuated effect of flankers was observed even when both the adaptor and flankers were suppressed from awareness. Flanker interference reduced the strength of early adaptation, regardless of visual awareness. Such interference on neural activity early in visual processing at the site of adaptation was likely to be a bottom-up phenomenon.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPion Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.perceptionweb.com-
dc.relation.ispartofPerceptionen_US
dc.subjectPsychology medical sciences-
dc.subjectOphthalmology and optometry-
dc.titleEffects of invisible flankers on invisible adaptoren_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, C: cristyho@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCheung, SH: singhang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, C=rp00859en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros188867en_US
dc.identifier.volume40-
dc.identifier.issueabstract suppl.-
dc.identifier.spage34-
dc.identifier.epage34-
dc.description.otherThe 34th European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP 2011), Toulouse, France, 11 August 2011. In Perception, 2011, v. 40 abstract suppl., p. 34-

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