File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Chinese primiparous women's experiences of early motherhood: Factors affecting maternal role competence

TitleChinese primiparous women's experiences of early motherhood: Factors affecting maternal role competence
Authors
KeywordsChinese mothers
Early motherhood
Maternal role competence
Issue Date2011
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0962-1067
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Nursing, 2011, v. 20 n. 9-10, p. 1481-1489 How to Cite?
AbstractAim. The aim of this study was to explore Chinese women's perceptions of maternal role competence and factors contributing to maternal role competence during early motherhood. Background. Developing a sense of competence and satisfaction in the maternal role are considered critical components in maternal adaptation, which have a significant impact on parenting behaviours and the psychosocial development of the child. However, qualitative studies that address maternal role competence are limited in the Chinese population. Design. This was an exploratory descriptive study. Method. A purposive sample of 26 Chinese primiparous mothers participated in a childbirth psychoeducation programme and was interviewed at sixweeks postpartum. Data were analysed using content analysis. Results. Women perceived a competent mother as being able to make a commitment to caring for the physical and emotional well-being of child, while cultivating appropriate values for childhood. Personal knowledge and experience of infant care, success in breastfeeding, infant's well-being, availability of social support and contradictory information from various sources were major factors affecting maternal role competency. Conclusion. The findings highlight the importance of understanding Chinese cultural attitudes to childrearing and maternal role competence. New Chinese mothers need information on child care, positive experiences of infant care, social support and consistent information to enhance their maternal role competency. Recommendations are made for Chinese culturally specific guidelines and healthcare delivery interventions to enhance maternal role competence in early motherhood. Relevance to clinical practice. Nursing and midwifery care should always take into account the cultural beliefs and enable adaptation of traditional postpartum practices. Providing consistent information and positive experience on parenting skills and infant behaviour as well as enhancing effective coping strategies could strengthen Chinese women's maternal role competency. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135942
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.384
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.755
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNgai, FWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, SWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHolroyd, Een_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T02:00:19Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T02:00:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Nursing, 2011, v. 20 n. 9-10, p. 1481-1489en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0962-1067en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135942-
dc.description.abstractAim. The aim of this study was to explore Chinese women's perceptions of maternal role competence and factors contributing to maternal role competence during early motherhood. Background. Developing a sense of competence and satisfaction in the maternal role are considered critical components in maternal adaptation, which have a significant impact on parenting behaviours and the psychosocial development of the child. However, qualitative studies that address maternal role competence are limited in the Chinese population. Design. This was an exploratory descriptive study. Method. A purposive sample of 26 Chinese primiparous mothers participated in a childbirth psychoeducation programme and was interviewed at sixweeks postpartum. Data were analysed using content analysis. Results. Women perceived a competent mother as being able to make a commitment to caring for the physical and emotional well-being of child, while cultivating appropriate values for childhood. Personal knowledge and experience of infant care, success in breastfeeding, infant's well-being, availability of social support and contradictory information from various sources were major factors affecting maternal role competency. Conclusion. The findings highlight the importance of understanding Chinese cultural attitudes to childrearing and maternal role competence. New Chinese mothers need information on child care, positive experiences of infant care, social support and consistent information to enhance their maternal role competency. Recommendations are made for Chinese culturally specific guidelines and healthcare delivery interventions to enhance maternal role competence in early motherhood. Relevance to clinical practice. Nursing and midwifery care should always take into account the cultural beliefs and enable adaptation of traditional postpartum practices. Providing consistent information and positive experience on parenting skills and infant behaviour as well as enhancing effective coping strategies could strengthen Chinese women's maternal role competency. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0962-1067en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Nursingen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com-
dc.subjectChinese mothersen_HK
dc.subjectEarly motherhooden_HK
dc.subjectMaternal role competenceen_HK
dc.subject.meshCultural Characteristics-
dc.subject.meshMothers-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy-
dc.subject.meshRole-
dc.subject.meshSelf Efficacy-
dc.titleChinese primiparous women's experiences of early motherhood: Factors affecting maternal role competenceen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNgai, FW: fwngai@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNgai, FW=rp01366en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2702.2010.03415.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21299660-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79954764147en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros186914en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79954764147&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume20en_HK
dc.identifier.issue9-10en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1481en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1489en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000289630400030-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNgai, FW=21735039700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, SW=47460941700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHolroyd, E=35609624800en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9204302-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats