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Conference Paper: BOLD fMRI study of the rat superior colliculus responding to a moving visual stimulus
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TitleBOLD fMRI study of the rat superior colliculus responding to a moving visual stimulus
 
AuthorsLau, C
Zhang, JW
Cheung, MHM
Xing, K
Zhou, IY
Chan, KCW
Wu, EX
 
Issue Date2011
 
CitationThe 19th Annual Meeting and Exhibition of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM 2011), Montreal, QC., 7-13 May 2011. In Proceedings of the 19th ISMRM, 2011, v. 19, p. 3678 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractINTRODUCTION: The superior colliculus (SC), or tectum, is a midbrain structure in vertebrates critical for directing eye movements[1]. It possesses neurons that are highly sensitive to moving stimuli[2]. To date, functional imaging has only been used to study the SC’s response to a stimulus moving at one speed[3]. Few fMRI studies have been conducted on the human SC because of technical challenges[4-5]. The rat SC occupies a significantly larger portion of the brain and receives a greater fraction of retinal projections. Thus, the rat is more suitable for studying SC function. In this study, we apply …
 
DescriptionSession - Animal fMRI: Computer 59 (Tuesday)
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorLau, C
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, JW
 
dc.contributor.authorCheung, MHM
 
dc.contributor.authorXing, K
 
dc.contributor.authorZhou, IY
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, KCW
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, EX
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:49:38Z
 
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:49:38Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: The superior colliculus (SC), or tectum, is a midbrain structure in vertebrates critical for directing eye movements[1]. It possesses neurons that are highly sensitive to moving stimuli[2]. To date, functional imaging has only been used to study the SC’s response to a stimulus moving at one speed[3]. Few fMRI studies have been conducted on the human SC because of technical challenges[4-5]. The rat SC occupies a significantly larger portion of the brain and receives a greater fraction of retinal projections. Thus, the rat is more suitable for studying SC function. In this study, we apply …
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.descriptionSession - Animal fMRI: Computer 59 (Tuesday)
 
dc.description.otherThe 19th Annual Meeting and Exhibition of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM 2011), Montreal, QC., 7-13 May 2011. In Proceedings of the 19th ISMRM, 2011, v. 19, p. 3678
 
dc.identifier.citationThe 19th Annual Meeting and Exhibition of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM 2011), Montreal, QC., 7-13 May 2011. In Proceedings of the 19th ISMRM, 2011, v. 19, p. 3678 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage3678
 
dc.identifier.hkuros186447
 
dc.identifier.spage3678
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135852
 
dc.identifier.volume19
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the 19th Annual Meeting and Exhibition of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, ISMRM 2011
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.titleBOLD fMRI study of the rat superior colliculus responding to a moving visual stimulus
 
dc.typeConference_Paper
 
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