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Conference Paper: Patient safety in undergraduate curriculum - medical students' perception

TitlePatient safety in undergraduate curriculum - medical students' perception
Authors
KeywordsCurriculum
Medical education
Medical errors
Patient safety
Issue Date2010
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0308-0110
Citation
The 7th Asian Pacific medical Education Conference (APMEC), Singapore, 4-8 February 2010. In Medical Education, 2010, v. 44 suppl. S4, p. 1 How to Cite?
AbstractPatient safety has emerged as a distinct healthcare discipline and has become a core curricular component in some medical schools. At the authors’ institution, an undergraduate program on patient safety has been introduced. The present study aimed at assessing our students’ perception and knowledge on patient safety issues. A self-administered voluntary questionnaire survey was conducted on 130 forth-year medical students with no prior exposure to patient safety teaching. Twenty-five questionnaire items were used to assess their perceptions on the causes and handling of errors, knowledge on patient safety issues, and attitudes towards patient safety teaching. The results showed that the majority of students agreed that medical errors were inevitable but over 25% opined that ‘competent physicians do not make errors’. The majority disapproved the practice of non-disclosure of error; whilst 6.3% would not address ‘near miss’ events, and 10% did not support an active reporting system. Twenty-seven percent did not agree that uncertainty should be tolerated in patient care, and over 80% agreed that the most effective strategy to prevent error is ‘to work harder and be more careful’. A knowledge gap on patient safety issues existed. Over 80% of students supported the introduction of our new undergraduate program. In conclusion, while our students were aware of medical errors being inevitable, they appeared to lack an appreciation of the multidisciplinary approach to the management of errors. A formal curriculum on patient safety is urgently needed in this locality and was found to be supported by our students.
DescriptionThis journal suppl. is the Special Issue: Abstracts of the 7th Asian Pacific medical Education Conference, APMEC 2010
Session - Curriculum Development and Evaluation: abstract no. 1
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135777
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.369
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.913

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GKKen_US
dc.contributor.authorPatil, NGen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:48:03Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:48:03Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 7th Asian Pacific medical Education Conference (APMEC), Singapore, 4-8 February 2010. In Medical Education, 2010, v. 44 suppl. S4, p. 1en_US
dc.identifier.issn0308-0110-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135777-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. is the Special Issue: Abstracts of the 7th Asian Pacific medical Education Conference, APMEC 2010-
dc.descriptionSession - Curriculum Development and Evaluation: abstract no. 1-
dc.description.abstractPatient safety has emerged as a distinct healthcare discipline and has become a core curricular component in some medical schools. At the authors’ institution, an undergraduate program on patient safety has been introduced. The present study aimed at assessing our students’ perception and knowledge on patient safety issues. A self-administered voluntary questionnaire survey was conducted on 130 forth-year medical students with no prior exposure to patient safety teaching. Twenty-five questionnaire items were used to assess their perceptions on the causes and handling of errors, knowledge on patient safety issues, and attitudes towards patient safety teaching. The results showed that the majority of students agreed that medical errors were inevitable but over 25% opined that ‘competent physicians do not make errors’. The majority disapproved the practice of non-disclosure of error; whilst 6.3% would not address ‘near miss’ events, and 10% did not support an active reporting system. Twenty-seven percent did not agree that uncertainty should be tolerated in patient care, and over 80% agreed that the most effective strategy to prevent error is ‘to work harder and be more careful’. A knowledge gap on patient safety issues existed. Over 80% of students supported the introduction of our new undergraduate program. In conclusion, while our students were aware of medical errors being inevitable, they appeared to lack an appreciation of the multidisciplinary approach to the management of errors. A formal curriculum on patient safety is urgently needed in this locality and was found to be supported by our students.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0308-0110-
dc.relation.ispartofMedical Educationen_US
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com-
dc.subjectCurriculum-
dc.subjectMedical education-
dc.subjectMedical errors-
dc.subjectPatient safety-
dc.titlePatient safety in undergraduate curriculum - medical students' perceptionen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GKK: gilberto@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailPatil, NG: ngpatil@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GKK=rp00522en_US
dc.identifier.authorityPatil, NG=rp00388en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2923.2010.03782.x-
dc.identifier.hkuros186478en_US
dc.identifier.volume44-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. S4-
dc.identifier.spage1-
dc.identifier.epage1-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 130325-

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