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Conference Paper: Peer-assisted online games with social reciprocity

TitlePeer-assisted online games with social reciprocity
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherIEEE.
Citation
The 19th IEEE International Workshop on Quality of Service (IWQoS 2011), San Jose, CA., 6-7 June 2011. In Proceedings of 19th IWQoS, 2011, p. 1-9 How to Cite?
AbstractOnline games and social networks are cross-pollinating rapidly in today's Internet: Online social network sites are deploying more and more games in their systems, while online game providers are leveraging social networks to power their games. An intriguing development as it is, the operational challenge in the previous game persists, i.e., the large server operational cost remains a non-negligible obstacle for deploying high-quality multi-player games. Peer-to-peer based game network design could be a rescue, only if the game players' mutual resource contribution has been fully incentivized and efficiently scheduled. Exploring the unique advantage of social network based games (social games), we advocate to utilize social reciprocities among peers with social relationships for efficient contribution incentivization and scheduling, so as to power a high-quality online game with low server cost. In this paper, social reciprocity is exploited with two give-and-take ratios at each peer: (1) peer contribution ratio (PCR), which evaluates the reciprocity level between a pair of social friends, and (2) system contribution ratio (SCR), which records the give-and-take level of the player to and from the entire network. We design efficient peer-to-peer mechanisms for game state distribution using the two ratios, where each player optimally decides which other players to seek relay help from and help in relaying game states, respectively, based on combined evaluations of their social relationship and historical reciprocity levels. Our design achieves effective incentives for resource contribution, load balancing among relay peers, as well as efficient social-aware resource scheduling. We also discuss practical implementation concerns and implement our design in a prototype online social game. Our extensive evaluations based on experiments on PlanetLab verify that high-quality large-scale social games can be achieved with conservative server costs. © 2011 IEEE.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135700
ISBN
ISSN
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, Zen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWu, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSun, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorYang, Sen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:46:57Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:46:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 19th IEEE International Workshop on Quality of Service (IWQoS 2011), San Jose, CA., 6-7 June 2011. In Proceedings of 19th IWQoS, 2011, p. 1-9en_HK
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-4577-0103-0-
dc.identifier.issn1548-615Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135700-
dc.description.abstractOnline games and social networks are cross-pollinating rapidly in today's Internet: Online social network sites are deploying more and more games in their systems, while online game providers are leveraging social networks to power their games. An intriguing development as it is, the operational challenge in the previous game persists, i.e., the large server operational cost remains a non-negligible obstacle for deploying high-quality multi-player games. Peer-to-peer based game network design could be a rescue, only if the game players' mutual resource contribution has been fully incentivized and efficiently scheduled. Exploring the unique advantage of social network based games (social games), we advocate to utilize social reciprocities among peers with social relationships for efficient contribution incentivization and scheduling, so as to power a high-quality online game with low server cost. In this paper, social reciprocity is exploited with two give-and-take ratios at each peer: (1) peer contribution ratio (PCR), which evaluates the reciprocity level between a pair of social friends, and (2) system contribution ratio (SCR), which records the give-and-take level of the player to and from the entire network. We design efficient peer-to-peer mechanisms for game state distribution using the two ratios, where each player optimally decides which other players to seek relay help from and help in relaying game states, respectively, based on combined evaluations of their social relationship and historical reciprocity levels. Our design achieves effective incentives for resource contribution, load balancing among relay peers, as well as efficient social-aware resource scheduling. We also discuss practical implementation concerns and implement our design in a prototype online social game. Our extensive evaluations based on experiments on PlanetLab verify that high-quality large-scale social games can be achieved with conservative server costs. © 2011 IEEE.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherIEEE.-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Workshop on Quality of Service Proceedingsen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsInternational Workshop on Quality of Service Proceedings. Copyright © IEEE.-
dc.rights©2011 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE.-
dc.titlePeer-assisted online games with social reciprocityen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=978-1-4577-0103-0&volume=&spage=1&epage=9&date=2011&atitle=Peer-assisted+online+games+with+social+reciprocity-
dc.identifier.emailWu, C:cwu@cs.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWu, C=rp01397en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/IWQOS.2011.5931316en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79960670528en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros187763en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79960670528&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.spage1-
dc.identifier.epage9-
dc.description.otherThe 19th IEEE International Workshop on Quality of Service (IWQoS 2011), San Jose, CA., 6-7 June 2011. In Proceedings of 19th IWQoS, 2011, p. 1-9-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, Z=7410041125en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, C=15836048100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSun, L=7403957453en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, S=35313102800en_HK

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