File Download
 
Links for fulltext
(May Require Subscription)
 
Supplementary

Article: Active video games for youth: A systematic review
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
TitleActive video games for youth: A systematic review
 
AuthorsBarnett, A2
Cerin, E2
Baranowski, T1
 
KeywordsEnergy expenditure
Enjoyment
Maintenance
Obesity
Physical activity
Sedentary
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherHuman Kinetics. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.humankinetics.com/JPAH
 
CitationJournal Of Physical Activity And Health, 2011, v. 8 n. 5, p. 724-737 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractBackground: A population level increase in physical activity (PA) is critical to reduce obesity in youth. Video games are highly popular and active video games (AVGs) have the potential to play a role in promoting youth PA. Method: Studies on AVG play energy expenditure (EE) and maintenance of play in youth were systematically identified in the published literature and assessed for quality and informational value. Results: Nine studies measuring AVG play EE were identified. The meta-analytic estimates of average METs across these studies were 3.1 (95% CI: 2.6, 3.6) to 3.2 (95% CI: 2.7, 3.7). No games elicited an average EE above the 6 MET threshold for vigorous EE. Observed differences between studies were likely due to the different types of games used, rather than age or gender. Four studies related to maintenance of play were identified. Most studies reported AVG use declined over time. Studies were of low-to-medium quality. Conclusion: AVGs are capable of generating EE in youth to attain PA guidelines. Few studies have assessed sustainability of AVG play, which appears to diminish after a short period of time for most players. Better-quality future research must address how AVG play could be maintained over longer periods of time. © 2011 Human Kinetics, Inc.
 
ISSN1543-3080
2012 Impact Factor: 1.854
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.018
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000292800900016
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorBarnett, A
 
dc.contributor.authorCerin, E
 
dc.contributor.authorBaranowski, T
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:39:47Z
 
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:39:47Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: A population level increase in physical activity (PA) is critical to reduce obesity in youth. Video games are highly popular and active video games (AVGs) have the potential to play a role in promoting youth PA. Method: Studies on AVG play energy expenditure (EE) and maintenance of play in youth were systematically identified in the published literature and assessed for quality and informational value. Results: Nine studies measuring AVG play EE were identified. The meta-analytic estimates of average METs across these studies were 3.1 (95% CI: 2.6, 3.6) to 3.2 (95% CI: 2.7, 3.7). No games elicited an average EE above the 6 MET threshold for vigorous EE. Observed differences between studies were likely due to the different types of games used, rather than age or gender. Four studies related to maintenance of play were identified. Most studies reported AVG use declined over time. Studies were of low-to-medium quality. Conclusion: AVGs are capable of generating EE in youth to attain PA guidelines. Few studies have assessed sustainability of AVG play, which appears to diminish after a short period of time for most players. Better-quality future research must address how AVG play could be maintained over longer periods of time. © 2011 Human Kinetics, Inc.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Physical Activity And Health, 2011, v. 8 n. 5, p. 724-737 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage737
 
dc.identifier.hkuros186899
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000292800900016
 
dc.identifier.issn1543-3080
2012 Impact Factor: 1.854
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.018
 
dc.identifier.issue5
 
dc.identifier.pmid21734319
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79959544367
 
dc.identifier.spage724
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135694
 
dc.identifier.volume8
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherHuman Kinetics. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.humankinetics.com/JPAH
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Physical Activity and Health
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
 
dc.subject.meshChild
 
dc.subject.meshEnergy Metabolism - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshExercise - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshVideo Games
 
dc.subjectEnergy expenditure
 
dc.subjectEnjoyment
 
dc.subjectMaintenance
 
dc.subjectObesity
 
dc.subjectPhysical activity
 
dc.subjectSedentary
 
dc.titleActive video games for youth: A systematic review
 
dc.typeArticle
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Barnett, A</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Cerin, E</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Baranowski, T</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2011-07-27T01:39:47Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2011-07-27T01:39:47Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2011</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>Journal Of Physical Activity And Health, 2011, v. 8 n. 5, p. 724-737</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>1543-3080</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/135694</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>Background: A population level increase in physical activity (PA) is critical to reduce obesity in youth. Video games are highly popular and active video games (AVGs) have the potential to play a role in promoting youth PA. Method: Studies on AVG play energy expenditure (EE) and maintenance of play in youth were systematically identified in the published literature and assessed for quality and informational value. Results: Nine studies measuring AVG play EE were identified. The meta-analytic estimates of average METs across these studies were 3.1 (95% CI: 2.6, 3.6) to 3.2 (95% CI: 2.7, 3.7). No games elicited an average EE above the 6 MET threshold for vigorous EE. Observed differences between studies were likely due to the different types of games used, rather than age or gender. Four studies related to maintenance of play were identified. Most studies reported AVG use declined over time. Studies were of low-to-medium quality. Conclusion: AVGs are capable of generating EE in youth to attain PA guidelines. Few studies have assessed sustainability of AVG play, which appears to diminish after a short period of time for most players. Better-quality future research must address how AVG play could be maintained over longer periods of time. &#169; 2011 Human Kinetics, Inc.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>Human Kinetics. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://www.humankinetics.com/JPAH</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>Journal of Physical Activity and Health</relation.ispartof>
<rights>Creative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License</rights>
<subject>Energy expenditure</subject>
<subject>Enjoyment</subject>
<subject>Maintenance</subject>
<subject>Obesity</subject>
<subject>Physical activity</subject>
<subject>Sedentary</subject>
<subject.mesh>Adolescent</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Child</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Energy Metabolism - physiology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Exercise - physiology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Video Games</subject.mesh>
<title>Active video games for youth: A systematic review</title>
<type>Article</type>
<description.nature>published_or_final_version</description.nature>
<identifier.pmid>21734319</identifier.pmid>
<identifier.scopus>eid_2-s2.0-79959544367</identifier.scopus>
<identifier.hkuros>186899</identifier.hkuros>
<relation.references>http://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79959544367&amp;selection=ref&amp;src=s&amp;origin=recordpage</relation.references>
<identifier.volume>8</identifier.volume>
<identifier.issue>5</identifier.issue>
<identifier.spage>724</identifier.spage>
<identifier.epage>737</identifier.epage>
<identifier.isi>WOS:000292800900016</identifier.isi>
<publisher.place>United States</publisher.place>
<bitstream.url>http://hub.hku.hk/bitstream/10722/135694/1/Content.pdf</bitstream.url>
</item>
Author Affiliations
  1. Baylor College of Medicine
  2. The University of Hong Kong