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Article: Central adiposity and the propensity for rehearsal in children

TitleCentral adiposity and the propensity for rehearsal in children
Authors
KeywordsObesity
Abdominal
Stress
Psychological
Child
Issue Date2011
PublisherDove Medical Press Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.dovepress.com/diabetes-metabolic-syndrome-and-obesity-targets-and-therapy-journal
Citation
Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy, 2011, v. 4, p. 225-228 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: There is increasing evidence that continuous activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis and the central sympathetic nervous system contributes to the pathogenesis of central adiposity via increased psychological stress. The purpose of this study was to examine the link between central adiposity and the propensity for Chinese children to rehearse emotionally upsetting events, a dimension of psychological stress. Additionally, gender differences in this relationship were explored. METHODS: Waist circumference, which is a marker of central adiposity and associated risks of developing cardiovascular disease, was measured and the propensity for rehearsal was assessed twice over two consecutive years in Hong Kong Chinese children (n = 194, aged 7-9 years), using a psychometric tool. RESULTS: Children with waist circumference indicative of a risk of cardiovascular disease displayed higher rehearsal scores than children categorized as 'not at risk', as did boys compared with girls. Our results suggest that central adiposity and the propensity for rehearsal of emotionally upsetting events may be linked in Chinese children. CONCLUSION: Future prospective studies examining the direction of causality between central adiposity and rehearsal can potentially have valuable clinical implications.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135693
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.257
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLing, FCMen_US
dc.contributor.authorMasters, RSWen_US
dc.contributor.authorYu, CCWen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcManus, AMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:39:47Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:39:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationDiabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy, 2011, v. 4, p. 225-228en_US
dc.identifier.issn1178-7007-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135693-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: There is increasing evidence that continuous activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis and the central sympathetic nervous system contributes to the pathogenesis of central adiposity via increased psychological stress. The purpose of this study was to examine the link between central adiposity and the propensity for Chinese children to rehearse emotionally upsetting events, a dimension of psychological stress. Additionally, gender differences in this relationship were explored. METHODS: Waist circumference, which is a marker of central adiposity and associated risks of developing cardiovascular disease, was measured and the propensity for rehearsal was assessed twice over two consecutive years in Hong Kong Chinese children (n = 194, aged 7-9 years), using a psychometric tool. RESULTS: Children with waist circumference indicative of a risk of cardiovascular disease displayed higher rehearsal scores than children categorized as 'not at risk', as did boys compared with girls. Our results suggest that central adiposity and the propensity for rehearsal of emotionally upsetting events may be linked in Chinese children. CONCLUSION: Future prospective studies examining the direction of causality between central adiposity and rehearsal can potentially have valuable clinical implications.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherDove Medical Press Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.dovepress.com/diabetes-metabolic-syndrome-and-obesity-targets-and-therapy-journalen_US
dc.relation.ispartofDiabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapyen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectObesity-
dc.subjectAbdominal-
dc.subjectStress-
dc.subjectPsychological-
dc.subjectChild-
dc.titleCentral adiposity and the propensity for rehearsal in childrenen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMasters, RSW: mastersr@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYu, CCW: yucw@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailMcManus, AM: alimac@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMasters, RSW=rp00935en_US
dc.identifier.authorityYu, CCW=rp00982en_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcManus, AM=rp00936en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.2147/DMSO.S22227-
dc.identifier.pmid21760739-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3131803-
dc.identifier.hkuros186321en_US
dc.identifier.volume4-
dc.identifier.spage225en_US
dc.identifier.epage228en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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