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Article: Bone loss during menopausal transition among southern Chinese women
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TitleBone loss during menopausal transition among southern Chinese women
 
AuthorsCheung, E3
Tsang, S1
Bow, C1
Soong, C1
Yeung, S1
Loong, C1
Cheung, CL1 2
Kan, A1
Lo, S4
Tam, S4
Tang, G1
Kung, A1
 
KeywordsBone loss
Chinese
Menopausal transition
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/maturitas
 
CitationMaturitas, 2011, v. 69 n. 1, p. 50-56 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.maturitas.2011.01.010
 
AbstractObjectives: Estrogen deficiency during menopausal transition is associated with rapid bone loss. The purpose of this study was to examine the time of onset, the rate, and predictors of menopausal bone loss. Study design: Prospective data were analyzed from 160 Chinese women between the ages of 45 to 55 years who participated in the Hong Kong Osteoporotic Study. Main outcome measures: All participants were studied yearly for 4 years. Demographic information, menstrual status according to the Stages of Reproductive Aging Workshop (STRAW), and lifestyle habits were recorded as well as bone mineral density (BMD) measured every visit. Baseline follicular stimulating hormone, sex hormone binding globulin, parathyroid hormones, C-terminal telopeptides of type 1 collagen, estradiol and testosterone were also measured. Results: There was no significant bone loss at the spine, femoral neck and total hip in premenopausal women. Maximal bone loss occurred within the STRAW stage -2 and -1. Age at menopause, baseline age, body weight and FSH were independent predictors of bone loss. Subjects in the lowest quartile of baseline body weight (<50 kg) lost bone 2 times faster at spine compared with those in the highest quartile (>61 kg). Subjects in the highest quartile of baseline FSH (>40 IU/l) lost bone 1.3-2.3 times faster at all 3 sites compared with those in the lowest quartile (<5.8 IU/l). Conclusion: Strategies to retard bone loss should be stressed to middle aged women, especially those with lean body built or with early menopause, to prevent osteoporosis later on in life. © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN0378-5122
2013 Impact Factor: 2.861
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.125
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.maturitas.2011.01.010
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000290889200010
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

This study is funded by University of Hong Kong.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorCheung, E
 
dc.contributor.authorTsang, S
 
dc.contributor.authorBow, C
 
dc.contributor.authorSoong, C
 
dc.contributor.authorYeung, S
 
dc.contributor.authorLoong, C
 
dc.contributor.authorCheung, CL
 
dc.contributor.authorKan, A
 
dc.contributor.authorLo, S
 
dc.contributor.authorTam, S
 
dc.contributor.authorTang, G
 
dc.contributor.authorKung, A
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:39:16Z
 
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:39:16Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Estrogen deficiency during menopausal transition is associated with rapid bone loss. The purpose of this study was to examine the time of onset, the rate, and predictors of menopausal bone loss. Study design: Prospective data were analyzed from 160 Chinese women between the ages of 45 to 55 years who participated in the Hong Kong Osteoporotic Study. Main outcome measures: All participants were studied yearly for 4 years. Demographic information, menstrual status according to the Stages of Reproductive Aging Workshop (STRAW), and lifestyle habits were recorded as well as bone mineral density (BMD) measured every visit. Baseline follicular stimulating hormone, sex hormone binding globulin, parathyroid hormones, C-terminal telopeptides of type 1 collagen, estradiol and testosterone were also measured. Results: There was no significant bone loss at the spine, femoral neck and total hip in premenopausal women. Maximal bone loss occurred within the STRAW stage -2 and -1. Age at menopause, baseline age, body weight and FSH were independent predictors of bone loss. Subjects in the lowest quartile of baseline body weight (<50 kg) lost bone 2 times faster at spine compared with those in the highest quartile (>61 kg). Subjects in the highest quartile of baseline FSH (>40 IU/l) lost bone 1.3-2.3 times faster at all 3 sites compared with those in the lowest quartile (<5.8 IU/l). Conclusion: Strategies to retard bone loss should be stressed to middle aged women, especially those with lean body built or with early menopause, to prevent osteoporosis later on in life. © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationMaturitas, 2011, v. 69 n. 1, p. 50-56 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.maturitas.2011.01.010
 
dc.identifier.citeulike8831947
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.maturitas.2011.01.010
 
dc.identifier.epage56
 
dc.identifier.hkuros188343
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000290889200010
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

This study is funded by University of Hong Kong.

 
dc.identifier.issn0378-5122
2013 Impact Factor: 2.861
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.125
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.pmid21310558
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79954629702
 
dc.identifier.spage50
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135682
 
dc.identifier.volume69
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/maturitas
 
dc.publisher.placeIreland
 
dc.relation.ispartofMaturitas
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshBody Weight
 
dc.subject.meshBone and Bones - pathology
 
dc.subject.meshEstrogens - deficiency
 
dc.subject.meshFollicle Stimulating Hormone - blood
 
dc.subject.meshMenopause - physiology
 
dc.subjectBone loss
 
dc.subjectChinese
 
dc.subjectMenopausal transition
 
dc.titleBone loss during menopausal transition among southern Chinese women
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Soong, C</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Yeung, S</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Loong, C</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Cheung, CL</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Kan, A</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lo, S</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Harvard Medical School
  3. United Christian Hospital Hong Kong
  4. Queen Mary Hospital Hong Kong