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Article: Same bed, different dreams: A comparative analysis of the growth and performance of SOEs in northeast and south China

TitleSame bed, different dreams: A comparative analysis of the growth and performance of SOEs in northeast and south China
Authors
KeywordsChina
Machinery industry
Political economy
SOEs
Transitional economy
Issue Date2010
PublisherNational Chengchi University, Institute of International Relations. The Journal's web site is located at http://iir.nccu.edu.tw/Issues&Studies/1_Homepage.htm
Citation
Issues And Studies, 2010, v. 46 n. 2, p. 33-86 How to Cite?
AbstractThe growth and transformation of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) in a changing socialist China has long been a popular focus of scholarly attention. Relatively little has been done to explain the growth dynamics and regional variation of China's SOEs. This paper investigates the spatial variation of China's SOEs through a comparative analysis of SOEs in northeast and south China. A detailed comparison of SOEs in the machinery industry sector located in Shenyang in the northeast and Guangzhou in the south has revealed an interesting pattern in which SOEs in the two locations were positioned in different production environments characterized by different norms of market competition and different types of political ties with the central state. The non-price norm of market competition and a political commitment to a state strategy of key equipment indigenization have provided incentives for SOEs in Shenyang to adopt a technically-oriented and independent-brand-based growth strategy in their direct engagements with transnational corporations, and these engagements have caused them to pursue the rapid expansion of production capacity and sales income at the expense of capital efficiency and external economies. In contrast, the pressures of market competition plus hardened budget constraints enforced by local governments has forced SOEs in Guangzhou to fall back on externally malleable production linkages and inter-firm networks, which have enabled them to adapt to emerging markets during the economic transition. While SOEs in the two locations share the same public property rights arrangements and operate in the same industrial sector, they are actually "different dreams" within the "same bed.". © Institute of International Relations, National Chengchi University, Taipei, Taiwan (ROC).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135652
ISSN
2012 Impact Factor: 0.043
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.162
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHu, FZYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLin, GCSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:38:41Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:38:41Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationIssues And Studies, 2010, v. 46 n. 2, p. 33-86en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1013-2511en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135652-
dc.description.abstractThe growth and transformation of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) in a changing socialist China has long been a popular focus of scholarly attention. Relatively little has been done to explain the growth dynamics and regional variation of China's SOEs. This paper investigates the spatial variation of China's SOEs through a comparative analysis of SOEs in northeast and south China. A detailed comparison of SOEs in the machinery industry sector located in Shenyang in the northeast and Guangzhou in the south has revealed an interesting pattern in which SOEs in the two locations were positioned in different production environments characterized by different norms of market competition and different types of political ties with the central state. The non-price norm of market competition and a political commitment to a state strategy of key equipment indigenization have provided incentives for SOEs in Shenyang to adopt a technically-oriented and independent-brand-based growth strategy in their direct engagements with transnational corporations, and these engagements have caused them to pursue the rapid expansion of production capacity and sales income at the expense of capital efficiency and external economies. In contrast, the pressures of market competition plus hardened budget constraints enforced by local governments has forced SOEs in Guangzhou to fall back on externally malleable production linkages and inter-firm networks, which have enabled them to adapt to emerging markets during the economic transition. While SOEs in the two locations share the same public property rights arrangements and operate in the same industrial sector, they are actually "different dreams" within the "same bed.". © Institute of International Relations, National Chengchi University, Taipei, Taiwan (ROC).en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNational Chengchi University, Institute of International Relations. The Journal's web site is located at http://iir.nccu.edu.tw/Issues&Studies/1_Homepage.htmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofIssues and Studiesen_HK
dc.subjectChinaen_HK
dc.subjectMachinery industryen_HK
dc.subjectPolitical economyen_HK
dc.subjectSOEsen_HK
dc.subjectTransitional economyen_HK
dc.titleSame bed, different dreams: A comparative analysis of the growth and performance of SOEs in northeast and south Chinaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHu, FZY:fzyhu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLin, GCS:gcslin@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHu, FZY=rp00861en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLin, GCS=rp00609en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78650086245en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros187472en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78650086245&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume46en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage33en_HK
dc.identifier.epage86en_HK
dc.publisher.placeTaiwan, Republic of Chinaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHu, FZY=8350486300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, GCS=7401699741en_HK

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