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Article: Estimating heat flux transmission of vertical greenery ecosystem

TitleEstimating heat flux transmission of vertical greenery ecosystem
Authors
KeywordsDiffuse solar radiation
Direct solar radiation
Global solar radiation
Green wall
Heat flux
Thermal shielding coefficient
Thermodynamics transmission model (TTM)
Vertical greening
Issue Date2011
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecoleng
Citation
Ecological Engineering, 2011, v. 37 n. 8, p. 1112-1122 How to Cite?
AbstractNurturing vegetation on building envelopes provides an innovative and eco-friendly alternative to urban greening especially in compact cities. Whereas the thermal and other benefits of green roofs have been studied intensively, green walls have received scanty attention. This study evaluates the thermodynamic transmission process of the vertical greenery ecosystem. We designed a field experiment to monitor solar radiation and weather conditions, and developed a thermodynamics transmission model to simulate heat flux and temperature variations. The model was calibrated, tested, and proved to be highly efficient. The results show that seasonal global and direct solar radiation drops to minimum in winter in January and February, and reaches maximum in summer in July and August (1168Wm -2 for global solar radiation and 889Wm -2 for direct solar radiation). Diffuse solar radiation attains maximum in summer (586Wm -2) with moderate rainfall in July and August, and minimum in winter with no rainfall in January and February. Radiation transmission of the green wall strongly correlates with canopy transmittance and reflectance (R 2=0.83). Thermal shielding effectiveness varies with orientation, with the south wall achieving a higher coefficient (0.31) than the north wall. The south wall has lower heat flux absorbance and heat flux loss than the north wall. The south wall can transfer much more heat flux through the vertical greenery ecosystem due to more intensive canopy evapotranspiration effect. The model matches the transmission properties of green wall radiation, and the model simulation fits empirical transmission results. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135651
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.74
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.112
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Midland Charitable Foundation
Stanley Ho Alumni Challenge Fund
Funding Information:

We acknowledge with gratitude the research Grants kindly provided by the Midland Charitable Foundation, and Stanley Ho Alumni Challenge Fund. We gratefully appreciate Pegasus Company for donating the vertical greening setup of our experimental site.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJim, CYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHe, Hen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:38:41Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:38:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEcological Engineering, 2011, v. 37 n. 8, p. 1112-1122en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0925-8574en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135651-
dc.description.abstractNurturing vegetation on building envelopes provides an innovative and eco-friendly alternative to urban greening especially in compact cities. Whereas the thermal and other benefits of green roofs have been studied intensively, green walls have received scanty attention. This study evaluates the thermodynamic transmission process of the vertical greenery ecosystem. We designed a field experiment to monitor solar radiation and weather conditions, and developed a thermodynamics transmission model to simulate heat flux and temperature variations. The model was calibrated, tested, and proved to be highly efficient. The results show that seasonal global and direct solar radiation drops to minimum in winter in January and February, and reaches maximum in summer in July and August (1168Wm -2 for global solar radiation and 889Wm -2 for direct solar radiation). Diffuse solar radiation attains maximum in summer (586Wm -2) with moderate rainfall in July and August, and minimum in winter with no rainfall in January and February. Radiation transmission of the green wall strongly correlates with canopy transmittance and reflectance (R 2=0.83). Thermal shielding effectiveness varies with orientation, with the south wall achieving a higher coefficient (0.31) than the north wall. The south wall has lower heat flux absorbance and heat flux loss than the north wall. The south wall can transfer much more heat flux through the vertical greenery ecosystem due to more intensive canopy evapotranspiration effect. The model matches the transmission properties of green wall radiation, and the model simulation fits empirical transmission results. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolengen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEcological Engineeringen_HK
dc.subjectDiffuse solar radiationen_HK
dc.subjectDirect solar radiationen_HK
dc.subjectGlobal solar radiationen_HK
dc.subjectGreen wallen_HK
dc.subjectHeat fluxen_HK
dc.subjectThermal shielding coefficienten_HK
dc.subjectThermodynamics transmission model (TTM)en_HK
dc.subjectVertical greeningen_HK
dc.titleEstimating heat flux transmission of vertical greenery ecosystemen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0925-8574&volume=37&issue=8&spage=1112&epage=1122&date=2011&atitle=Estimating+heat+flux+transmission+of+vertical+greenery+ecosystem-
dc.identifier.emailJim, CY:hragjcy@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJim, CY=rp00549en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ecoleng.2011.02.005en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79958019189en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros186576en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79958019189&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume37en_HK
dc.identifier.issue8en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1112en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1122en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1872-6992-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000292434400003-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJim, CY=7006143750en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHe, H=55214930400en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9200347-

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