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Article: Organizational tenure and job performance

TitleOrganizational tenure and job performance
Authors
KeywordsJob performance
Meta-analysis
Organizational tenure
Productivity
Seniority
Issue Date2010
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=10604
Citation
Journal Of Management, 2010, v. 36 n. 5, p. 1220-1250 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study provides a meta-analysis on the relationships between organizational tenure and three broad classes of job behaviors: core-task behaviors, citizenship behaviors, and counterproductive behaviors. Across 350 empirical studies with a cumulative sample size of 249,841, the authors found that longer tenured employees generally have greater in-role performance and citizenship performance. It is interesting that organizational tenure was also positively related to some counterproductive behaviors (e.g., aggressive behavior and nonsickness absence). Most of these relationships remain statistically significant even after controlling for the effects of chronological age. The authors also observed that the tenure-performance relationship was stronger for younger workers, for women, for non-Caucasians, and for college-educated workers. Finally, the authors found evidence of a curvilinear relationship between organizational tenure and job performance. Although the relationship of organizational tenure with job performance is positive in general, the strength of the association decreases as organizational tenure increases. © The Author(s) 2010.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135643
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.051
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.617
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, TWHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFeldman, DCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:38:31Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:38:31Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Management, 2010, v. 36 n. 5, p. 1220-1250en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0149-2063en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135643-
dc.description.abstractThis study provides a meta-analysis on the relationships between organizational tenure and three broad classes of job behaviors: core-task behaviors, citizenship behaviors, and counterproductive behaviors. Across 350 empirical studies with a cumulative sample size of 249,841, the authors found that longer tenured employees generally have greater in-role performance and citizenship performance. It is interesting that organizational tenure was also positively related to some counterproductive behaviors (e.g., aggressive behavior and nonsickness absence). Most of these relationships remain statistically significant even after controlling for the effects of chronological age. The authors also observed that the tenure-performance relationship was stronger for younger workers, for women, for non-Caucasians, and for college-educated workers. Finally, the authors found evidence of a curvilinear relationship between organizational tenure and job performance. Although the relationship of organizational tenure with job performance is positive in general, the strength of the association decreases as organizational tenure increases. © The Author(s) 2010.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journal.aspx?pid=10604en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Managementen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Management. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc.-
dc.subjectJob performanceen_HK
dc.subjectMeta-analysisen_HK
dc.subjectOrganizational tenureen_HK
dc.subjectProductivityen_HK
dc.subjectSeniorityen_HK
dc.titleOrganizational tenure and job performanceen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNg, TWH: twhng@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNg, TWH=rp01088en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0149206309359809en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77955191529en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros186228en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77955191529&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume36en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1220en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1250en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1557-1211-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000282519600005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, TWH=8564407300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFeldman, DC=7402702773en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike7678485-

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