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Article: Dysprosody and stimulus effects in Cantonese speakers with Parkinson's disease

TitleDysprosody and stimulus effects in Cantonese speakers with Parkinson's disease
Authors
KeywordsDysarthria
Parkinson's disease
Perceptual analysis
Prosody
Stimulus effect
Issue Date2010
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://informahealthcare.com/lcd
Citation
International Journal Of Language And Communication Disorders, 2010, v. 45 n. 6, p. 645-655 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Dysprosody is a common feature in speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria. However, speech prosody varies across different types of speech materials. This raises the question of what is the most appropriate speech material for the evaluation of dysprosody.Aims: To characterize the prosodic impairment in Cantonese speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria associated with Parkinson's disease, and to determine the effect of different types of speech stimuli on the perceptual rating of prosody.Methods & Procedures: Speech data in the form of sentence reading, passage reading, and monologue were collected from ten Cantonese speakers with Parkinson's disease. Perceptual analysis was conducted on ten prosodic parameters to evaluate five dimensions of prosody, based on a theoretical framework: pitch, loudness, duration, voice quality, and degree of reduction.Outcomes & Results: The results showed that the most severely affected prosodic parameters were monopitch, harsh voice, and monoloudness, followed by breathy voice and prolonged interval. Differences were noted between speakers with mild and moderate dysprosody. No statistically significant differences were found between the three types of stimuli. However, qualitative analysis revealed noticeable differences between the three stimuli in two speakers.Conclusions & Implications: The prosodic profile of Cantonese speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria is similar to those of other languages (for example, English). The involvement of two new dimensions in the definition of prosody (voice quality and degree of reduction) provides additional insight in differentiating patients with mild and moderate dysarthria. Further investigation on the use of speech materials in the clinical evaluation of speech prosody in speakers with dysarthria is needed, as no single task was found to represent a patient's performance under all circumstances. © 2010 Royal College of Speech & Language Therapists.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135612
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.798
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.968
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMa, JKYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWhitehill, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KSKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:37:31Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:37:31Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Language And Communication Disorders, 2010, v. 45 n. 6, p. 645-655en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1368-2822en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135612-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Dysprosody is a common feature in speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria. However, speech prosody varies across different types of speech materials. This raises the question of what is the most appropriate speech material for the evaluation of dysprosody.Aims: To characterize the prosodic impairment in Cantonese speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria associated with Parkinson's disease, and to determine the effect of different types of speech stimuli on the perceptual rating of prosody.Methods & Procedures: Speech data in the form of sentence reading, passage reading, and monologue were collected from ten Cantonese speakers with Parkinson's disease. Perceptual analysis was conducted on ten prosodic parameters to evaluate five dimensions of prosody, based on a theoretical framework: pitch, loudness, duration, voice quality, and degree of reduction.Outcomes & Results: The results showed that the most severely affected prosodic parameters were monopitch, harsh voice, and monoloudness, followed by breathy voice and prolonged interval. Differences were noted between speakers with mild and moderate dysprosody. No statistically significant differences were found between the three types of stimuli. However, qualitative analysis revealed noticeable differences between the three stimuli in two speakers.Conclusions & Implications: The prosodic profile of Cantonese speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria is similar to those of other languages (for example, English). The involvement of two new dimensions in the definition of prosody (voice quality and degree of reduction) provides additional insight in differentiating patients with mild and moderate dysarthria. Further investigation on the use of speech materials in the clinical evaluation of speech prosody in speakers with dysarthria is needed, as no single task was found to represent a patient's performance under all circumstances. © 2010 Royal College of Speech & Language Therapists.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://informahealthcare.com/lcden_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Language and Communication Disordersen_HK
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.comen_US
dc.subjectDysarthriaen_HK
dc.subjectParkinson's diseaseen_HK
dc.subjectPerceptual analysisen_HK
dc.subjectProsodyen_HK
dc.subjectStimulus effecten_HK
dc.subject.meshDysarthria - etiology - physiopathology-
dc.subject.meshHypokinesia - complications - physiopathology-
dc.subject.meshParkinson Disease - complications - physiopathology-
dc.subject.meshPhonetics-
dc.subject.meshSpeech Perception-
dc.titleDysprosody and stimulus effects in Cantonese speakers with Parkinson's diseaseen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1368-2822&volume=45&issue=6&spage=645&epage=655&date=2010&atitle=Dysprosody+and+stimulus+effects+in+Cantonese+speakers+with+Parkinson%27s+disease-
dc.identifier.emailWhitehill, T: tara@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWhitehill, T=rp00970en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/13682820903434813en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19995207-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77957912374en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros188338en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77957912374&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume45en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage645en_HK
dc.identifier.epage655en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1460-6984-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000282751000003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMa, JKY=14018311400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWhitehill, T=7004098633en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, KSK=36604094100en_HK

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