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Article: Self and the other in the Confucian cultural context: Implications of China's higher education development for comparative studies

TitleSelf and the other in the Confucian cultural context: Implications of China's higher education development for comparative studies
Authors
KeywordsComparative studies
Context
Culture
Higher education
Ways of thinking
Issue Date2011
PublisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0020-8566
Citation
International Review of Education, 2011, v. 57 n. 3-4, p. 337-355 How to Cite?
AbstractThe central purpose of China's modern higher education has been to combine Chinese and Western elements at all levels including institutional arrangements, research methodologies, educational ideals and cultural spirit, a combination that brings together aspects of Chinese and Western philosophical heritages. This, however, has not been achieved. There is an urgent need for critical examination of the long-term consequences of grafting American academic practices onto a Chinese base. This article examines the tensions in the interactions in higher education between the traditional Chinese and the imposed Western modes of thinking. Borrowing a definition of the structure of culture, this paper reveals the various extents to which layers of Chinese higher education have achieved any degree of success. It finds that with a strong catch-up mentality, China's contemporary higher education policies are responsive to Western influences. These are however only applied as panic-stricken and expedient band-aid remedies, rather than as strategies based on systematic understanding of cultural contexts. Accordingly, Chinese universities are uncritical towards the European-American model and its variants. This article warns that without an infusion of traditional education values, universities in China risk losing touch with their cultural contexts in their quest for world-class status. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135586
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.369

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYang, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:37:24Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:37:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Review of Education, 2011, v. 57 n. 3-4, p. 337-355en_US
dc.identifier.issn0020-8566en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135586-
dc.description.abstractThe central purpose of China's modern higher education has been to combine Chinese and Western elements at all levels including institutional arrangements, research methodologies, educational ideals and cultural spirit, a combination that brings together aspects of Chinese and Western philosophical heritages. This, however, has not been achieved. There is an urgent need for critical examination of the long-term consequences of grafting American academic practices onto a Chinese base. This article examines the tensions in the interactions in higher education between the traditional Chinese and the imposed Western modes of thinking. Borrowing a definition of the structure of culture, this paper reveals the various extents to which layers of Chinese higher education have achieved any degree of success. It finds that with a strong catch-up mentality, China's contemporary higher education policies are responsive to Western influences. These are however only applied as panic-stricken and expedient band-aid remedies, rather than as strategies based on systematic understanding of cultural contexts. Accordingly, Chinese universities are uncritical towards the European-American model and its variants. This article warns that without an infusion of traditional education values, universities in China risk losing touch with their cultural contexts in their quest for world-class status. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0020-8566en_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Review of Educationen_US
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.comen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectComparative studies-
dc.subjectContext-
dc.subjectCulture-
dc.subjectHigher education-
dc.subjectWays of thinking-
dc.titleSelf and the other in the Confucian cultural context: Implications of China's higher education development for comparative studiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYang, R: yangrui@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYang, R=rp00980en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11159-011-9208-x-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80855123869-
dc.identifier.hkuros187136en_US
dc.identifier.volume57-
dc.identifier.issue3-4-
dc.identifier.spage337-
dc.identifier.epage355-
dc.identifier.eissn1573-0638-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-
dc.identifier.citeulike9652535-

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