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Article: Impact of antiviral therapy on the survival of patients after major hepatectomy for hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma

TitleImpact of antiviral therapy on the survival of patients after major hepatectomy for hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma
Authors
KeywordsAntiviral therapy
Cancer invasion
Cancer staging
Cancer survival
Controlled study
Issue Date2011
PublisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archsurg.com
Citation
Archives Of Surgery, 2011, v. 146 n. 6, p. 675-681 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To assess whether commencement of antiviral therapy after hepatectomy improves the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in preoperatively antiviral-naive patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Design: Retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database. Setting: University teaching hospital. Main Outcome Measures: Disease-free and overall survival rates. Results: One hundred thirty-six patients received major hepatectomy for HBV-related HCC from September 1, 2003, through December 31, 2007. Among them, 42 patients received antiviral therapy (treatment group) after hepatectomy, whereas 94 did not (control group). Patient demographics, preoperative liver function, tumor characteristics, and liver function at the time of tumor recurrence were comparable between the 2 groups. Disease-free and overall survival rates were significantly prolonged in the treatment group. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates in the treatment group were 88.1%, 79.1%, and 71.2%, respectively; in the control group, 76.5%, 47.5%, and 43.5%, respectively (P=.005). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year disease-free survival rates in the treatment group were 66.5%, 51.4%, and 51.4%, respectively; in the control group, 48.9%, 33.8%, and 33.8%, respectively (P=.05). Subgroup analysis stratified against tumor stage and major vascular invasion showed that posthepatectomy antiviral treatment conferred a significant survival benefit in stages I and II tumors or HCCs without major venous invasion. Conclusions: Antiviral therapy improves the prognosis of HBV-related HCC. It should be considered after hepatectomy for HBV-related HCC, especially in early-stage tumors. ©2011 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135519
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 4.926
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, ACYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChok, KSHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, WKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, SCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPoon, RTPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLo, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFan, STen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:36:24Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:36:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationArchives Of Surgery, 2011, v. 146 n. 6, p. 675-681en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0004-0010en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135519-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To assess whether commencement of antiviral therapy after hepatectomy improves the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in preoperatively antiviral-naive patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Design: Retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database. Setting: University teaching hospital. Main Outcome Measures: Disease-free and overall survival rates. Results: One hundred thirty-six patients received major hepatectomy for HBV-related HCC from September 1, 2003, through December 31, 2007. Among them, 42 patients received antiviral therapy (treatment group) after hepatectomy, whereas 94 did not (control group). Patient demographics, preoperative liver function, tumor characteristics, and liver function at the time of tumor recurrence were comparable between the 2 groups. Disease-free and overall survival rates were significantly prolonged in the treatment group. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates in the treatment group were 88.1%, 79.1%, and 71.2%, respectively; in the control group, 76.5%, 47.5%, and 43.5%, respectively (P=.005). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year disease-free survival rates in the treatment group were 66.5%, 51.4%, and 51.4%, respectively; in the control group, 48.9%, 33.8%, and 33.8%, respectively (P=.05). Subgroup analysis stratified against tumor stage and major vascular invasion showed that posthepatectomy antiviral treatment conferred a significant survival benefit in stages I and II tumors or HCCs without major venous invasion. Conclusions: Antiviral therapy improves the prognosis of HBV-related HCC. It should be considered after hepatectomy for HBV-related HCC, especially in early-stage tumors. ©2011 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archsurg.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of Surgeryen_HK
dc.subjectAntiviral therapy-
dc.subjectCancer invasion-
dc.subjectCancer staging-
dc.subjectCancer survival-
dc.subjectControlled study-
dc.titleImpact of antiviral therapy on the survival of patients after major hepatectomy for hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinomaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0004-0010&volume=146&issue=6&spage=675&epage=681&date=2011&atitle=Impact+of+antiviral+therapy+on+the+survival+of+patients+after+major+hepatectomy+for+hepatitis+B+virus-related+hepatocellular+carcinoma-
dc.identifier.emailChan, ACY: acchan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, SC: chanlsc@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPoon, RTP: poontp@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLo, CM: chungmlo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailFan, ST: stfan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, ACY=rp00310en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SC=rp01568en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPoon, RTP=rp00446en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLo, CM=rp00412en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFan, ST=rp00355en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1001/archsurg.2011.125en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21690443-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79959336054en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros187483en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79959336054&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume146en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage675en_HK
dc.identifier.epage681en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000291851500009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, ACY=15828849100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChok, KSH=6508229426en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, WK=7102761292en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, SC=7404255575en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoon, RTP=7103097223en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, CM=7401771672en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFan, ST=7402678224en_HK

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