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Article: Assessing pain in depression: What do ratings on unidimensional pain scales really mean?

TitleAssessing pain in depression: What do ratings on unidimensional pain scales really mean?
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/comppsych
Citation
Comprehensive Psychiatry, 2011, v. 52 n. 2, p. 208-217 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: The study aims to determine which dimensions of pain-somatosensory, affective, or evaluative-would predict unidimensional pain scores in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD); compare the results with findings in cancer and chronic musculoskeletal pain patients; and examine the relationship between pain complaints and psychopathology. Methods: This is a 3-month prospective, observational study. Ninety-one Chinese patients were enrolled during an acute episode of MDD. Multidimensional Affect and Pain Survey (MAPS) was used to assess the multidimensional aspects of pain. Unidimensional pain intensity was evaluated using verbal rating scale (VRS) and visual analog scale (VAS). Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were used to assess depressive and anxiety symptoms. Results: The VRS and VAS pain scores were more highly correlated with MAPS somatosensory supercluster than with Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and MAPS emotional and well-being superclusters. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that unidimensional pain scores were predicted better by MAPS somatosensory than by emotional clusters. The explained variance of VRS and VAS scores could be improved by 9% to 16% by adding somatosensory clusters after controlling for emotional clusters, whereas 1% to 4% of the variance was improved by adding emotional clusters after controlling for somatosensory clusters. Pain intensity was more closely related to anxiety symptoms than to depressive symptoms cross-sectionally and longitudinally. Conclusion: Our data suggest that pain and emotional symptoms in MDD are not entirely related. In cases in which pain symptoms are severe or remain persistent despite treatment of depression, specific strategy targeting pain may be needed. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135423
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.043
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.100
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChung, KFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTso, KCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:34:57Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:34:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationComprehensive Psychiatry, 2011, v. 52 n. 2, p. 208-217en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0010-440Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135423-
dc.description.abstractObjective: The study aims to determine which dimensions of pain-somatosensory, affective, or evaluative-would predict unidimensional pain scores in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD); compare the results with findings in cancer and chronic musculoskeletal pain patients; and examine the relationship between pain complaints and psychopathology. Methods: This is a 3-month prospective, observational study. Ninety-one Chinese patients were enrolled during an acute episode of MDD. Multidimensional Affect and Pain Survey (MAPS) was used to assess the multidimensional aspects of pain. Unidimensional pain intensity was evaluated using verbal rating scale (VRS) and visual analog scale (VAS). Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were used to assess depressive and anxiety symptoms. Results: The VRS and VAS pain scores were more highly correlated with MAPS somatosensory supercluster than with Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and MAPS emotional and well-being superclusters. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that unidimensional pain scores were predicted better by MAPS somatosensory than by emotional clusters. The explained variance of VRS and VAS scores could be improved by 9% to 16% by adding somatosensory clusters after controlling for emotional clusters, whereas 1% to 4% of the variance was improved by adding emotional clusters after controlling for somatosensory clusters. Pain intensity was more closely related to anxiety symptoms than to depressive symptoms cross-sectionally and longitudinally. Conclusion: Our data suggest that pain and emotional symptoms in MDD are not entirely related. In cases in which pain symptoms are severe or remain persistent despite treatment of depression, specific strategy targeting pain may be needed. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/comppsychen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofComprehensive Psychiatryen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnxiety - complications - diagnosis - psychology-
dc.subject.meshDepression - complications - diagnosis - psychology-
dc.subject.meshDepressive Disorder - complications - diagnosis - psychology-
dc.subject.meshPain - complications - diagnosis - psychology-
dc.subject.meshPain Measurement - methods-
dc.titleAssessing pain in depression: What do ratings on unidimensional pain scales really mean?en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0010-440X&volume=52&issue=2&spage=208&epage=217&date=2011&atitle=Assessing+pain+in+depression:+What+do+ratings+on+unidimensional+pain+scales+really+mean?-
dc.identifier.emailChung, KF: kfchung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChung, KF=rp00377en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.comppsych.2010.03.008en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21295228-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79551592210en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros187461en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79551592210&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume52en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage208en_HK
dc.identifier.epage217en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000287647700013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, KF=7404086681en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTso, KC=7003571935en_HK

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