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Article: Gray matter in first-episode schizophrenia before and after antipsychotic drug treatment. Anatomical likelihood estimation meta-analyses with sample size weighting

TitleGray matter in first-episode schizophrenia before and after antipsychotic drug treatment. Anatomical likelihood estimation meta-analyses with sample size weighting
Authors
KeywordsALEn
brain structure
meta-analysis
neuroleptic naive
subtraction analysis
voxel-based morphometry
Issue Date2011
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://schizophreniabulletin.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Schizophrenia Bulletin, 2011, v. 37 n. 1, p. 199-211 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Cerebral morphological abnormalities in schizophrenia may be modulated by treatment, chronicity, and duration of illness. Comparing brain imaging studies of individuals with first-episode schizophrenia and neuroleptic naive (NN-FES) with that of their neuroleptic-treated counterparts (NT-FES) can help to dissect out the effect of these potential confounders. Methods: We used the anatomical likelihood estimation method to compare voxel-based morphometric studies of NN-FES (n = 162 patients) and NT-FES (n = 336 patients) studies. The analysis included a sample size weighting step based on the Liptak-Stouffer method to reflect the greater power of larger studies. Results: Patient samples were matched for age, gender, and duration of illness. An extensive network of gray matter deficits in frontal, temporal, insular, striatal, posterior cingulate, and cerebellar regions was detected in the NN-FES samples as compared with healthy controls. Major deficits were detected in the frontal, superior temporal, insular, and parahippocampal regions for the NT-FES group compared with the NN-FES group. In addition, the NT-FES group showed minor deficits in the caudate, cingulate, and inferior temporal regions compared with the NN-FES group. There were no regions with gray matter volumetric excess in the NT-FES group. Conclusion: Frontal, striato-limbic, and temporal morphological abnormalities are present in the early stage of schizophrenia and are unrelated to the effects of neuroleptic treatment, chronicity, and duration of illness. There may be dynamic effects of treatment on striato-limbic and temporal, but not frontal, regional gray matter volumes of the brain. © 2010 The Author.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135414
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.757
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.051
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

The University of Hong Kong Research Postgraduate studentship to M. L.; The University of Hong Kong Funding to S.C.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYu, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorYip, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorSham, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Qen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChua, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcAlonan, Gen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:34:52Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:34:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSchizophrenia Bulletin, 2011, v. 37 n. 1, p. 199-211en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0586-7614en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135414-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Cerebral morphological abnormalities in schizophrenia may be modulated by treatment, chronicity, and duration of illness. Comparing brain imaging studies of individuals with first-episode schizophrenia and neuroleptic naive (NN-FES) with that of their neuroleptic-treated counterparts (NT-FES) can help to dissect out the effect of these potential confounders. Methods: We used the anatomical likelihood estimation method to compare voxel-based morphometric studies of NN-FES (n = 162 patients) and NT-FES (n = 336 patients) studies. The analysis included a sample size weighting step based on the Liptak-Stouffer method to reflect the greater power of larger studies. Results: Patient samples were matched for age, gender, and duration of illness. An extensive network of gray matter deficits in frontal, temporal, insular, striatal, posterior cingulate, and cerebellar regions was detected in the NN-FES samples as compared with healthy controls. Major deficits were detected in the frontal, superior temporal, insular, and parahippocampal regions for the NT-FES group compared with the NN-FES group. In addition, the NT-FES group showed minor deficits in the caudate, cingulate, and inferior temporal regions compared with the NN-FES group. There were no regions with gray matter volumetric excess in the NT-FES group. Conclusion: Frontal, striato-limbic, and temporal morphological abnormalities are present in the early stage of schizophrenia and are unrelated to the effects of neuroleptic treatment, chronicity, and duration of illness. There may be dynamic effects of treatment on striato-limbic and temporal, but not frontal, regional gray matter volumes of the brain. © 2010 The Author.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://schizophreniabulletin.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSchizophrenia Bulletinen_HK
dc.subjectALEnen_HK
dc.subjectbrain structureen_HK
dc.subjectmeta-analysisen_HK
dc.subjectneuroleptic naiveen_HK
dc.subjectsubtraction analysisen_HK
dc.subjectvoxel-based morphometryen_HK
dc.subject.meshAntipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use-
dc.subject.meshBrain - pathology-
dc.subject.meshDisease Progression-
dc.subject.meshFrontal Lobe - pathology-
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia - drug therapy - pathology-
dc.titleGray matter in first-episode schizophrenia before and after antipsychotic drug treatment. Anatomical likelihood estimation meta-analyses with sample size weightingen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0586-7614&volume=37&issue=1&spage=199&epage=211&date=2011&atitle=Gray+matter+in+first-episode+schizophrenia+before+and+after+antipsychotic+drug+treatment:+anatomical+likelihood+estimation+meta-analyses+with+sample+size+weighting-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, C: charlton@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSham, P: pcsham@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChua, S: sechua@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcAlonan, G: mcalonan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, C=rp01574en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySham, P=rp00459en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChua, S=rp00438en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcAlonan, G=rp00475en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/schbul/sbp099en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19759093-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3004197-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78651338152en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros187344en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78651338152&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume37en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage199en_HK
dc.identifier.epage211en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000285845300024-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, M=36552785900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, C=7202061845en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, K=36706689100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, B=16685586100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, P=34573429300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, Q=22034705700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChua, S=7201550427en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcAlonan, G=6603123011en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike10462761-

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