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Article: Are bipolar disorder and schizophrenia neuroanatomically distinct? An anatomical likelihood meta-analysis

TitleAre bipolar disorder and schizophrenia neuroanatomically distinct? An anatomical likelihood meta-analysis
Authors
KeywordsBipolar
Gray matter
Meta-analysis
Schizophrenia
Voxel-based
Issue Date2010
PublisherFrontiers Research Foundation. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.frontiersin.org/humanneuroscience/
Citation
Frontiers In Human Neuroscience, 2010, v. 4 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: There is renewed debate on whether modern diagnostic classification should adopt a dichotomous or dimensional approach to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. This study synthesizes data from voxel-based studies of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder to estimate the extent to which these conditions have a common neuroanatomical phenotype. Methods: A post-hoc meta-analytic estimation of the extent to which bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or both conditions contribute to brain gray matter differences compared to controls was achieved using a novel application of the conventional anatomical likelihood estimation (ALE) method. 19 schizophrenia studies (651 patients and 693 controls) were matched as closely as possible to 19 bipolar studies (540 patients and 745 controls). Result: Substantial overlaps in the regions affected by schizophrenia and bipolar disorder included regions in prefrontal cortex, thalamus, left caudate, left medial temporal lobe, and right insula. Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia jointly contributed to clusters in the right hemisphere, but schizophrenia was almost exclusively associated with additional gray matter deficits (left insula and amygdala) in the left hemisphere. Limitation: The current meta-analytic method has a number of constraints. Importantly, only studies identifying differences between controls and patient groups could be included in this analysis. Conclusion: Bipolar disorder shares many of the same brain regions as schizophrenia. However, relative to neurotypical controls, lower gray matter volume in schizophrenia is more extensive and includes the amygdala. This fresh application of ALE accommodates multiple studies in a relatively unbiased comparison. Common biological mechanisms may explain the neuroanatomical overlap between these major disorders, but explaining why brain differences are more extensive in schizophrenia remains challenging. © 2010 Yu, Cheung, Leung, Li, Chua and McAlonan.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135412
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.634
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.841
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYu, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Qen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChua, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcAlonan, Gen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:34:50Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:34:50Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers In Human Neuroscience, 2010, v. 4en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1662-5161en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135412-
dc.description.abstractObjective: There is renewed debate on whether modern diagnostic classification should adopt a dichotomous or dimensional approach to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. This study synthesizes data from voxel-based studies of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder to estimate the extent to which these conditions have a common neuroanatomical phenotype. Methods: A post-hoc meta-analytic estimation of the extent to which bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or both conditions contribute to brain gray matter differences compared to controls was achieved using a novel application of the conventional anatomical likelihood estimation (ALE) method. 19 schizophrenia studies (651 patients and 693 controls) were matched as closely as possible to 19 bipolar studies (540 patients and 745 controls). Result: Substantial overlaps in the regions affected by schizophrenia and bipolar disorder included regions in prefrontal cortex, thalamus, left caudate, left medial temporal lobe, and right insula. Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia jointly contributed to clusters in the right hemisphere, but schizophrenia was almost exclusively associated with additional gray matter deficits (left insula and amygdala) in the left hemisphere. Limitation: The current meta-analytic method has a number of constraints. Importantly, only studies identifying differences between controls and patient groups could be included in this analysis. Conclusion: Bipolar disorder shares many of the same brain regions as schizophrenia. However, relative to neurotypical controls, lower gray matter volume in schizophrenia is more extensive and includes the amygdala. This fresh application of ALE accommodates multiple studies in a relatively unbiased comparison. Common biological mechanisms may explain the neuroanatomical overlap between these major disorders, but explaining why brain differences are more extensive in schizophrenia remains challenging. © 2010 Yu, Cheung, Leung, Li, Chua and McAlonan.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundation. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.frontiersin.org/humanneuroscience/ en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Human Neuroscienceen_HK
dc.rightsThis Document is Protected by copyright and was first published by Frontiers. All rights reserved. It is reproduced with permission.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectBipolaren_HK
dc.subjectGray matteren_HK
dc.subjectMeta-analysisen_HK
dc.subjectSchizophreniaen_HK
dc.subjectVoxel-baseden_HK
dc.titleAre bipolar disorder and schizophrenia neuroanatomically distinct? An anatomical likelihood meta-analysisen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, C: charlton@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChua, S: sechua@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMcAlonan, G: mcalonan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, C=rp01574en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChua, S=rp00438en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcAlonan, G=rp00475en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fnhum.2010.00189en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21103008-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2987512-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79953020186en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros187270en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79953020186&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume4en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4, article no. 189en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000289310400001-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerlanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, K=36706689100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, C=7202061845en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, M=36552785900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, Q=36065644400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChua, S=7201550427en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcAlonan, G=6603123011en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike8418709-

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