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Article: Prevalence of neurological soft signs and their neuropsychological correlates in typically developing Chinese children and Chinese children with ADHD
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TitlePrevalence of neurological soft signs and their neuropsychological correlates in typically developing Chinese children and Chinese children with ADHD
 
AuthorsChan, RCK4
McAlonan, GM2
Yang, B1
Lin, L6
Shum, D5
Manschreck, TC3
 
Issue Date2010
 
PublisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/87565641.asp
 
CitationDevelopmental Neuropsychology, 2010, v. 35 n. 6, p. 698-711 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/87565641.2010.508552
 
AbstractThis study examined prevalence of soft signs in 214 typically developing Chinese children and investigated whether soft signs are associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in this population. Chinese children with ADHD (N = 54) scored significantly higher than age-matched controls on all three soft signs subscales and motor coordination correlated significantly with Stroop interference. Logistic regression supported the utility of the soft sign scales in discriminating children with ADHD and controls. Children with ADHD had a significant excess of soft signs, which may be a useful marker of developmental disruption in this clinical condition. 2010 10 30. Copyright © 2010 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.
 
ISSN8756-5641
2013 Impact Factor: 2.670
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.764
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/87565641.2010.508552
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000283679700006
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Oriented Hundred Talents ProgrammeO7CX031003
Chinese Academy of SciencesKSCX2-YW-R-131
National Natural Science Foundation of China30770723
Funding Information:

This study was supported partially by the Project-Oriented Hundred Talents Programme (O7CX031003), the Knowledge Innovation Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (KSCX2-YW-R-131), and a grant from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (30770723) to Raymond Chan. These funding agents had no role in the study design; collection, analysis, and interpretation of the data; writing of the article; or decision to submit the article for publication.

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChan, RCK
 
dc.contributor.authorMcAlonan, GM
 
dc.contributor.authorYang, B
 
dc.contributor.authorLin, L
 
dc.contributor.authorShum, D
 
dc.contributor.authorManschreck, TC
 
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:34:50Z
 
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:34:50Z
 
dc.date.issued2010
 
dc.description.abstractThis study examined prevalence of soft signs in 214 typically developing Chinese children and investigated whether soft signs are associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in this population. Chinese children with ADHD (N = 54) scored significantly higher than age-matched controls on all three soft signs subscales and motor coordination correlated significantly with Stroop interference. Logistic regression supported the utility of the soft sign scales in discriminating children with ADHD and controls. Children with ADHD had a significant excess of soft signs, which may be a useful marker of developmental disruption in this clinical condition. 2010 10 30. Copyright © 2010 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationDevelopmental Neuropsychology, 2010, v. 35 n. 6, p. 698-711 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/87565641.2010.508552
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/87565641.2010.508552
 
dc.identifier.epage711
 
dc.identifier.hkuros187266
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000283679700006
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Oriented Hundred Talents ProgrammeO7CX031003
Chinese Academy of SciencesKSCX2-YW-R-131
National Natural Science Foundation of China30770723
Funding Information:

This study was supported partially by the Project-Oriented Hundred Talents Programme (O7CX031003), the Knowledge Innovation Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (KSCX2-YW-R-131), and a grant from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (30770723) to Raymond Chan. These funding agents had no role in the study design; collection, analysis, and interpretation of the data; writing of the article; or decision to submit the article for publication.

 
dc.identifier.issn8756-5641
2013 Impact Factor: 2.670
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.764
 
dc.identifier.issue6
 
dc.identifier.pmid21038161
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78149265741
 
dc.identifier.spage698
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135411
 
dc.identifier.volume35
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/87565641.asp
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofDevelopmental Neuropsychology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsDevelopmental Neuropsychology. Copyright © Taylor & Francis (Psychology Press).
 
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics and numerical data
 
dc.subject.meshAttention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
 
dc.subject.meshChild Development
 
dc.subject.meshMotor Activity
 
dc.subject.meshPsychomotor Performance
 
dc.titlePrevalence of neurological soft signs and their neuropsychological correlates in typically developing Chinese children and Chinese children with ADHD
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. Shenzhen Children's Hospital
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Harvard Medical School
  4. Institute of Psychology Chinese Academy of Sciences
  5. Griffith University
  6. East China Normal University