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Article: Social attribution in children with high functioning autism and Asperger syndrome: An exploratory study in the Chinese setting

TitleSocial attribution in children with high functioning autism and Asperger syndrome: An exploratory study in the Chinese setting
Authors
KeywordsAutistic spectrum disorders
Chinese
Social attribution
Social cognition
Issue Date2011
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/709651
Citation
Research In Autism Spectrum Disorders, 2011, v. 5 n. 4, p. 1538-1548 How to Cite?
AbstractThe present study aimed to examine social attribution in children with high-functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger's syndrome (AS). A sample of 20 boys (9 with HFA and 11 with AS) and 20 age-matched controls were recruited for this study. All participated in two tasks measuring social attribution ability, the conventional Social Attribution Task (SAT) and a modified version with animals rather than shapes (mSAT). They also completed a battery of neuropsychological tests. Compared to typically developing controls, children with autism spectrum disorders were impaired on some measures in both SATs. However, group differences in 'theory-of-mind' indices were only significant in the mSAT, with the ASD group performing more poorly than controls. In addition, the scores in person index of both versions of the SAT correlated with executive function in children with HFA/AS. The current study found the mSAT paradigm was especially sensitive to ToM difficulties in young Chinese children with HFA/AS. Social attribution in children with HFA/AS, unlike neurotypical children, was related to executive function ability, suggesting these psychological domains are not distinct in children with autism spectrum disorders. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135405
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.317
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.992
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, RCKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHu, ZYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCui, JFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcAlonan, GMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:34:47Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:34:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationResearch In Autism Spectrum Disorders, 2011, v. 5 n. 4, p. 1538-1548en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1750-9467en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135405-
dc.description.abstractThe present study aimed to examine social attribution in children with high-functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger's syndrome (AS). A sample of 20 boys (9 with HFA and 11 with AS) and 20 age-matched controls were recruited for this study. All participated in two tasks measuring social attribution ability, the conventional Social Attribution Task (SAT) and a modified version with animals rather than shapes (mSAT). They also completed a battery of neuropsychological tests. Compared to typically developing controls, children with autism spectrum disorders were impaired on some measures in both SATs. However, group differences in 'theory-of-mind' indices were only significant in the mSAT, with the ASD group performing more poorly than controls. In addition, the scores in person index of both versions of the SAT correlated with executive function in children with HFA/AS. The current study found the mSAT paradigm was especially sensitive to ToM difficulties in young Chinese children with HFA/AS. Social attribution in children with HFA/AS, unlike neurotypical children, was related to executive function ability, suggesting these psychological domains are not distinct in children with autism spectrum disorders. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/product/cws_home/709651en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofResearch in Autism Spectrum Disordersen_HK
dc.subjectAutistic spectrum disordersen_HK
dc.subjectChineseen_HK
dc.subjectSocial attributionen_HK
dc.subjectSocial cognitionen_HK
dc.titleSocial attribution in children with high functioning autism and Asperger syndrome: An exploratory study in the Chinese settingen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1750-9467&volume=5&issue=4&spage=1538&epage=1548&date=2011&atitle=Social+attribution+in+children+with+high+functioning+autism+and+Asperger+syndrome:+an+exploratory+study+in+the+Chinese+setting-
dc.identifier.emailMcAlonan, GM: mcalonan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMcAlonan, GM=rp00475en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.rasd.2011.02.017en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79958074203en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros187255en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79958074203&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume5en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1538en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1548en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000292235600029-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, RCK=35236280300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHu, ZY=14041568300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCui, JF=7401811729en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, Y=14032537300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcAlonan, GM=6603123011en_HK

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