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Article: Quality of life in major depressive disorder: The role of pain and pain catastrophizing cognition

TitleQuality of life in major depressive disorder: The role of pain and pain catastrophizing cognition
Authors
KeywordsAnxiety
Cognition
Major clinical study
Pain assessment
Psychological rating scale
Issue Date2012
PublisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/comppsych
Citation
Comprehensive Psychiatry, 2012, v. 53 n. 4, p. 387-395 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: Pain symptoms are frequent complaints in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Although it is known that pain intensity and pain-related cognition predict quality of life (QOL) in patients with chronic pain, limited studies have examined their roles in MDD. The study aimed to determine whether pain and pain catastrophizing were independent predictors of QOL in MDD after accounting for the impact of anxiety and depression. Methods: This is a prospective, naturalistic follow-up study. Ninety-one Chinese patients were enrolled during an acute episode of MDD, 82 of them were reassessed 3 months later using the same assessment on pain, anxiety, depression, and QOL. Pain intensity was evaluated using a verbal rating scale and a visual analog scale. Quality of life was assessed using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey. Pain-related cognition was assessed at baseline with the Pain Catastrophizing Scale. Results: There was significant improvement in pain, anxiety, depression, and QOL from baseline to 3-month follow-up. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that pain intensity was significantly associated with QOL at baseline and 3 months. Pain complaint was more important than anxiety and depressive symptoms in predicting changes in both physical and psychosocial domains of QOL. After controlling for the severity of pain, anxiety, and depression, Pain Catastrophizing Scale score was independently associated with QOL in MDD. Conclusion: The study supports the specific role of pain and pain-related cognition in predicting QOL in depressed patients. Further studies targeting pain-related cognition for improving the outcome of MDD are necessary. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135401
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.043
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.100
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChung, KFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTso, KCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYeung, WFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, WHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:34:45Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:34:45Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_HK
dc.identifier.citationComprehensive Psychiatry, 2012, v. 53 n. 4, p. 387-395en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0010-440Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135401-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Pain symptoms are frequent complaints in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Although it is known that pain intensity and pain-related cognition predict quality of life (QOL) in patients with chronic pain, limited studies have examined their roles in MDD. The study aimed to determine whether pain and pain catastrophizing were independent predictors of QOL in MDD after accounting for the impact of anxiety and depression. Methods: This is a prospective, naturalistic follow-up study. Ninety-one Chinese patients were enrolled during an acute episode of MDD, 82 of them were reassessed 3 months later using the same assessment on pain, anxiety, depression, and QOL. Pain intensity was evaluated using a verbal rating scale and a visual analog scale. Quality of life was assessed using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey. Pain-related cognition was assessed at baseline with the Pain Catastrophizing Scale. Results: There was significant improvement in pain, anxiety, depression, and QOL from baseline to 3-month follow-up. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that pain intensity was significantly associated with QOL at baseline and 3 months. Pain complaint was more important than anxiety and depressive symptoms in predicting changes in both physical and psychosocial domains of QOL. After controlling for the severity of pain, anxiety, and depression, Pain Catastrophizing Scale score was independently associated with QOL in MDD. Conclusion: The study supports the specific role of pain and pain-related cognition in predicting QOL in depressed patients. Further studies targeting pain-related cognition for improving the outcome of MDD are necessary. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/comppsychen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofComprehensive Psychiatryen_HK
dc.subjectAnxiety-
dc.subjectCognition-
dc.subjectMajor clinical study-
dc.subjectPain assessment-
dc.subjectPsychological rating scale-
dc.titleQuality of life in major depressive disorder: The role of pain and pain catastrophizing cognitionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChung, KF: kfchung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChung, KF=rp00377en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.comppsych.2011.05.005en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21684536-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84859895229en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros186977en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84859895229&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume53en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage387en_HK
dc.identifier.epage395en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000303288400010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, KF=7404086681en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTso, KC=7003571935en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, WF=24345897100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, WH=40462004700en_HK

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