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Article: TP receptors and oxidative stress. Hand in hand from endothelial dysfunction to atherosclerosis

TitleTP receptors and oxidative stress. Hand in hand from endothelial dysfunction to atherosclerosis
Authors
KeywordsDiabetes
Endothelium
Hypertension
Inflammation
Prostacyclin
Thromboxane
Issue Date2010
PublisherAcademic Press.
Citation
Advances In Pharmacology, 2010, v. 60 C, p. 90-106 How to Cite?
AbstractThromboxane A 2 and the activation of TP receptors that it causes play an important role in platelet aggregation and therefore in thrombosis. However, TP receptors are also involved in the pathologies of the vascular wall including impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation, increased oxidant generation, and increased expression of adhesion molecules. The beneficial effects of TP antagonists on the vascular wall attenuate these features of vascular disease. They are not shared by aspirin. In fact, TP antagonists are active in patients treated with aspirin, indicating that their potential beneficial effects are mediated by mechanisms different from the antithrombotic actions of aspirin. Our studies have demonstrated the vascular benefits of TP antagonists in experimental animals, particularly in models of diabetes mellitus, in which elevated levels of eicosanoids play a role not only in vascular pathologies but also in those of the kidney and other tissues. They suggest that TP blockade protects against fundamental and widespread tissular dysfunction associated with metabolic disease including hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia. TP receptor antagonists represent a promising avenue for the prevention of vascular disease in part because of these pleiotropic actions that extend beyond their antithrombotic properties. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135345
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.718
PubMed Central ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFélétou, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorCohen, RAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorVanhoutte, PMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorVerbeuren, TJen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:33:56Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:33:56Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAdvances In Pharmacology, 2010, v. 60 C, p. 90-106en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1054-3589en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135345-
dc.description.abstractThromboxane A 2 and the activation of TP receptors that it causes play an important role in platelet aggregation and therefore in thrombosis. However, TP receptors are also involved in the pathologies of the vascular wall including impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation, increased oxidant generation, and increased expression of adhesion molecules. The beneficial effects of TP antagonists on the vascular wall attenuate these features of vascular disease. They are not shared by aspirin. In fact, TP antagonists are active in patients treated with aspirin, indicating that their potential beneficial effects are mediated by mechanisms different from the antithrombotic actions of aspirin. Our studies have demonstrated the vascular benefits of TP antagonists in experimental animals, particularly in models of diabetes mellitus, in which elevated levels of eicosanoids play a role not only in vascular pathologies but also in those of the kidney and other tissues. They suggest that TP blockade protects against fundamental and widespread tissular dysfunction associated with metabolic disease including hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia. TP receptor antagonists represent a promising avenue for the prevention of vascular disease in part because of these pleiotropic actions that extend beyond their antithrombotic properties. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press.-
dc.relation.ispartofAdvances in Pharmacologyen_HK
dc.subjectDiabetesen_HK
dc.subjectEndotheliumen_HK
dc.subjectHypertensionen_HK
dc.subjectInflammationen_HK
dc.subjectProstacyclinen_HK
dc.subjectThromboxaneen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshAtherosclerosis - metabolism - physiopathology - prevention and control-
dc.subject.meshEndothelium, Vascular - drug effects - metabolism - physiopathology-
dc.subject.meshOxidative Stress - drug effects-
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Thromboxane - antagonists and inhibitors - metabolism-
dc.titleTP receptors and oxidative stress. Hand in hand from endothelial dysfunction to atherosclerosisen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailVanhoutte, PM: vanhoutt@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityVanhoutte, PM=rp00238en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/B978-0-12-385061-4.00004-0en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21081216-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3004095-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78349291477en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros186244en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78349291477&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume60en_HK
dc.identifier.issueCen_HK
dc.identifier.spage90en_HK
dc.identifier.epage106en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFélétou, M=7006461826en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCohen, RA=35562815800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVanhoutte, PM=7202304247en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVerbeuren, TJ=7007006534en_HK

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