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Article: Acupuncture for acute management and rehabilitation of traumatic brain injury.

TitleAcupuncture for acute management and rehabilitation of traumatic brain injury.
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mrw.interscience.wiley.com/cochrane/cochrane_clsysrev_articles_fs.html
Citation
Cochrane Database Of Systematic Reviews (Online), 2011, v. 5, p. CD007700 How to Cite?
AbstractTraumatic brain injury (TBI) can be life threatening depending on the severity of the insult to the brain. It can also cause a range of debilitating sequelae which require cognitive, motor, communication, emotional, or behavioral rehabilitation of varying intensity and duration. A number of studies conducted and published in China have suggested that acupuncture may be beneficial in the acute treatment and rehabilitation of TBI. To determine the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in the acute management or rehabilitation (or both) of patients with a TBI, including cognitive, neurological, motor, communication, emotional, or behavioral complications, or a combination of such complications. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials 2008, Issue 2 (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, PsycINFO and others. We also searched the Chinese Acupuncture Studies Register, the Studies Register of the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field, NCCAM, and NIH Clinical Studies Database. Three major Mainland Chinese academic literature databases (CNKI, VIP and Wang Fang Data) were also searched using keywords in simplified Chinese. Searches were completed in December 2009. Randomized controlled studies evaluating different variants of acupuncture and involving participants of any age who had suffered a TBI. Included trials compared acupuncture with placebo or sham treatment, or acupuncture plus other treatments compared with the same other treatments. We excluded trials that only compared different variants of acupuncture or compared acupuncture alone against other treatments alone, as they did not yield the net effect of acupuncture. Two review authors identified potential articles from the literature search and extracted data independently using a data extraction form. We performed methodological assessment of included studies using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias. We were unable to perform quantitative data analysis due to insufficient included studies and available data. Four RCTs, including 294 participants, reported outcomes specified by this review. Three investigated electro-acupuncture for TBI while one investigated acupuncture for acute TBI. The results seem to suggest that acupuncture is efficacious for these indications, however the low methodological quality of these studies renders the results questionable. No adverse effects of acupuncture were reported in any of the studies. The low methodological quality of the included studies does not allow us to make conclusive judgments on the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in either the acute treatment and/or rehabilitation of TBI. Its beneficial role for these indications remains uncertain. Further research with high quality trials is required.
DescriptionComment in Eur J Phys Rehabil Med. 2011 Sep;47(3):507-511.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135320
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 6.035
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.366
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hospital Authority, Hong Kong
'Integration of Chinese Medicine and Western Medicine in Acute Rehabilitation of Traumatic Brain Injury and Other Neurological Disorders'
Funding Information:

Internal sources

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheuk, DKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChu, Ven_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:33:32Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:33:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCochrane Database Of Systematic Reviews (Online), 2011, v. 5, p. CD007700en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1469-493Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135320-
dc.descriptionComment in Eur J Phys Rehabil Med. 2011 Sep;47(3):507-511.-
dc.description.abstractTraumatic brain injury (TBI) can be life threatening depending on the severity of the insult to the brain. It can also cause a range of debilitating sequelae which require cognitive, motor, communication, emotional, or behavioral rehabilitation of varying intensity and duration. A number of studies conducted and published in China have suggested that acupuncture may be beneficial in the acute treatment and rehabilitation of TBI. To determine the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in the acute management or rehabilitation (or both) of patients with a TBI, including cognitive, neurological, motor, communication, emotional, or behavioral complications, or a combination of such complications. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials 2008, Issue 2 (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, PsycINFO and others. We also searched the Chinese Acupuncture Studies Register, the Studies Register of the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field, NCCAM, and NIH Clinical Studies Database. Three major Mainland Chinese academic literature databases (CNKI, VIP and Wang Fang Data) were also searched using keywords in simplified Chinese. Searches were completed in December 2009. Randomized controlled studies evaluating different variants of acupuncture and involving participants of any age who had suffered a TBI. Included trials compared acupuncture with placebo or sham treatment, or acupuncture plus other treatments compared with the same other treatments. We excluded trials that only compared different variants of acupuncture or compared acupuncture alone against other treatments alone, as they did not yield the net effect of acupuncture. Two review authors identified potential articles from the literature search and extracted data independently using a data extraction form. We performed methodological assessment of included studies using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias. We were unable to perform quantitative data analysis due to insufficient included studies and available data. Four RCTs, including 294 participants, reported outcomes specified by this review. Three investigated electro-acupuncture for TBI while one investigated acupuncture for acute TBI. The results seem to suggest that acupuncture is efficacious for these indications, however the low methodological quality of these studies renders the results questionable. No adverse effects of acupuncture were reported in any of the studies. The low methodological quality of the included studies does not allow us to make conclusive judgments on the efficacy and safety of acupuncture in either the acute treatment and/or rehabilitation of TBI. Its beneficial role for these indications remains uncertain. Further research with high quality trials is required.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mrw.interscience.wiley.com/cochrane/cochrane_clsysrev_articles_fs.htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofCochrane database of systematic reviews (Online)en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsCochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.-
dc.rightsThis review is published as a Cochrane Review in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 5. Cochrane Reviews are regularly updated as new evidence emerges and in response to comments and criticisms, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews should be consulted for the most recent version of the Review.-
dc.subject.meshAcupuncture Therapy - methods-
dc.subject.meshBrain Injuries - rehabilitation - therapy-
dc.subject.meshElectroacupuncture-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshRandomized Controlled Trials as Topic-
dc.titleAcupuncture for acute management and rehabilitation of traumatic brain injury.en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, V:vcnwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, V=rp00334en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/14651858.CD007700.pub2en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21563159-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79959502612en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros186262en_US
dc.identifier.volume5en_HK
dc.identifier.spageCD007700en_HK
dc.identifier.epageCD007700en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000290496400016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, V=7202525632en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheuk, DK=8705936100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, S=35113421300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChu, V=34874602000en_HK

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