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Article: Somatosensory-evoked potentials as an indicator for the extent of ultrastructural damage of the spinal cord after chronic compressive injuries in a rat model

TitleSomatosensory-evoked potentials as an indicator for the extent of ultrastructural damage of the spinal cord after chronic compressive injuries in a rat model
Authors
KeywordsChronic compression
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
Micro-computed tomography (μCT)
Spinal cord
Ultrastructure
Issue Date2011
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/clinph
Citation
Clinical Neurophysiology, 2011, v. 122 n. 7, p. 1440-1447 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: Somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) were found to correlate well with the disability and postoperative recovery in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Yet the exact pathophysiology behind it remains to be elucidated. This study aims to characterise the ultrastructural changes of a chronically compressive spinal cord with various SEP responses in a rat model. Methods: A total of 15 rats were used with surgical implantation of a water-absorbing polymer sheet into the cervical spinal canal on the postero-lateral side, which expanded over time to induce chronic compression in the cord. At postoperative 6 months, the functional integrity of the cords was recorded by SEP responses by comparing injured and non-injured sides, and the ultrastructural integrity was assessed by 7-T magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion imaging, contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography (μCT) and histological evaluations. Results: Six rats showed unchanged SEP, and the other nine showed decreased amplitude only (n= 5) or delayed latency (n= 4). The circulation insults of the cords were found among all the rats, showing central canal enlargement, intra-tissue bleeding or increased blood vessels in the central grey matter. Ultrastructural damage was noted in the rats with changed SEP responses, which was suggested by lower fractional anisotropy and higher contrast intensity radiologically and echoed by less myelin stain and cavitation changes histologically. In the animals with delayed latency, the cord showed significant loss of motoneurons as well as gross appearance distortion. Conclusions: The categorised SEP responses by amplitude and latency could be an indicator for the extent of ultrastructural damage of the spinal cord after chronic compressive injuries. Significance: The findings built a solid foundation for SEP application in clinical diagnosis and prognostication of spinal cord injuries. © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135302
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.426
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.581
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong ITF Tier 3ITS/149/08
research Grants Council of the Hong Kong SAR, ChinaGRF771608M/GRF713006E
University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

This work was partially supported by Hong Kong ITF Tier 3 (ITS/149/08), research Grants Council of the Hong Kong SAR, China (GRF771608M/GRF713006E) and the Seeding Funding Program of the University of Hong Kong. The authors would like to thanks Dr. Y. Guo and Dr. G. Zhao for surgical assistance in the establishment of the animal models.

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHu, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWen, CYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, MMHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWu, EXKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLuk, KDKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T01:31:49Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T01:31:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationClinical Neurophysiology, 2011, v. 122 n. 7, p. 1440-1447en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1388-2457en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/135302-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) were found to correlate well with the disability and postoperative recovery in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Yet the exact pathophysiology behind it remains to be elucidated. This study aims to characterise the ultrastructural changes of a chronically compressive spinal cord with various SEP responses in a rat model. Methods: A total of 15 rats were used with surgical implantation of a water-absorbing polymer sheet into the cervical spinal canal on the postero-lateral side, which expanded over time to induce chronic compression in the cord. At postoperative 6 months, the functional integrity of the cords was recorded by SEP responses by comparing injured and non-injured sides, and the ultrastructural integrity was assessed by 7-T magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion imaging, contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography (μCT) and histological evaluations. Results: Six rats showed unchanged SEP, and the other nine showed decreased amplitude only (n= 5) or delayed latency (n= 4). The circulation insults of the cords were found among all the rats, showing central canal enlargement, intra-tissue bleeding or increased blood vessels in the central grey matter. Ultrastructural damage was noted in the rats with changed SEP responses, which was suggested by lower fractional anisotropy and higher contrast intensity radiologically and echoed by less myelin stain and cavitation changes histologically. In the animals with delayed latency, the cord showed significant loss of motoneurons as well as gross appearance distortion. Conclusions: The categorised SEP responses by amplitude and latency could be an indicator for the extent of ultrastructural damage of the spinal cord after chronic compressive injuries. Significance: The findings built a solid foundation for SEP application in clinical diagnosis and prognostication of spinal cord injuries. © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/clinphen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Neurophysiologyen_HK
dc.subjectChronic compressionen_HK
dc.subjectMagnetic resonance imaging (MRI)en_HK
dc.subjectMicro-computed tomography (μCT)en_HK
dc.subjectSpinal corden_HK
dc.subjectUltrastructureen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnisotropy-
dc.subject.meshDiffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging-
dc.subject.meshEvoked Potentials, Somatosensory - physiology-
dc.subject.meshSpinal Cord - pathology - ultrastructure-
dc.subject.meshSpinal Cord Compression - pathology - physiopathology-
dc.titleSomatosensory-evoked potentials as an indicator for the extent of ultrastructural damage of the spinal cord after chronic compressive injuries in a rat modelen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1388-2457&volume=122&issue=7&spage=1440&epage=1447&date=2011&atitle=Somatosensory-evoked+potentials+as+an+indicator+for+the+extent+of+ultrastructural+damage+of+the+spinal+cord+after+chronic+compressive+injuries+in+a+rat+modelen_US
dc.identifier.emailHu, Y:yhud@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWu, EXK:ewu1@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLuk, KDK:hcm21000@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHu, Y=rp00432en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWu, EXK=rp00193en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, KDK=rp00333en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.clinph.2010.12.051en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21330197-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79957597549en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros188831en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros207325-
dc.identifier.hkuros206808-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79957597549&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume122en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1440en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1447en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1872-8952-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000291102300025-
dc.publisher.placeIrelanden_HK
dc.relation.projectHardware oriented processor for evoked potential fast extraction and auto-detection-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHu, Y=7407116091en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWen, CY=36731630800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, TH=36731309200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, MMH=24333907800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, EXK=7202128034en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuk, KDK=7201921573en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike8846359-

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